?

Log in

No account? Create an account

Previous 50

Oct. 17th, 2014

BIOFEEDBACK narzędziem wspierającym proces rehabilitacji osób po wypadkach

rehabilitacja-neurologicznafizjoterapiarehabilitacja-funkcjonalnanauka-chodu_1



http://bcove.me/1fs3dd7l

Zaprezentowany powyżej link zaprowadzi Państwa do filmu ukazującego amerykański eksperyment wspierający proces osób poszkodowanych w wypadkach drogowych. Osoby z urazam,i narządów ruchu w toku trzytygodniowej terapii rehabilitacyjnej wspartej BIOFEEDBACKIEM  wstały z wózków i zaczęły samodzielną rehabilitację ruchową

Brzmi aż niewiarygiodnie ....

Tym bardziej więc zachęcam do lektury

Z Szacunkiem

Dariusz Wyspiański

NEUROPSYCHOTERAPIA

Jan. 27th, 2014

HRV BIOFEEDBACK narzędziem zwiększania efektywności w pracy psycho-manualnej



Szanowni Państwo,

Pozwalam sobie na zacytowanie "abstractu" naukowego artykułu, podsumowującego prowadzone  w Malezji badania dot. wykorzystania HRV Biofeedbacku do zwiększania efektywności w pracy bazującej na czynnosciach poznawczo-manualnych

Z Szacunkiem

D.Wyspiański


Heart Rate Variability (HRV) biofeedback: A new training approach for operator’s performance enhancement
Auditya Purwandini Sutarto, Muhammad Nubli Abdul Wahab, Nora Mat Zin

"Abstract: The widespread implementation of advanced and complex systems requires predominantly operators’ cognitive functions and less importance of human manual control. On the other hand, most operators perform their cognitive functions below their peak cognitive capacity level due to fatigue, stress, and boredom. Thus, there is a need to improve their cognitive functions during work. The goal of this paper is to present a psychophysiology training approach derived from cardiovascular response named heart rate variability (HRV) biofeedback. Description of resonant frequency biofeedback - a specific HRV training protocol - is discussed as well as its supported researches for the performance enhancement. HRV biofeedback training works by teaching people to recognize their involuntary HRV and to control patterns of this physiological response. The training is directed to increase HRV amplitude that promotes autonomic nervous system balance. This balance is associated with improved physiological functioning as well as psychological benefits. Most individuals can learn HRV biofeedback training easily which involves slowing the breathing rate (around six breaths/min) to each individual’s resonant frequency at which the amplitude of HRV is maximized. Maximal control over HRV can be obtained in most people after approximately four sessions of training. Recent studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of HRV biofeedback to the improvement of some cognitive functions in both simulated and real industrial operators...."


NEUROPSYCHOTERAPIA

Oct. 13th, 2013

Oni stosują BIOFEEDBACK - "RHEIN NECKAR LOWEN" - Piłka Ręczna



"RHEIN NECKAR LOWEN", to słynna niemiecka drużyna piłki ręcznej, znana także z tego, że występowali w niej znani polscy zawodnicy (min. bramkarz Sławomir SZMAL). "LWY" od kilku lat z powodzeniem wykorzystują BIOFEEDBACK w modalnościach GSR i HRV do przedmeczowej koncentracji. To bardzo interesujące albowiem w światowym "HANDBALLU" BIOFEEDBACK nie jeszcze rozpowszechniony.

Z Szacunkiem

Dariusz Wyspiański

Sep. 23rd, 2013

WILD DIVINE - GSR BIOFEEDBACK SYSTEM - NOWA MEDYTACJA

Szanowni Państwo,

Przedstawiam najnowszy film medytacyjny stanowiący część oprogramowania zestawu "WILD DIVINE" :

Aug. 19th, 2013

BIOFEEDBACK w terapii PTSD



Szanowni Państwo,

PTSD (Nabyty Zespół Stresu Pourazowego) coraz częściej dotyczy także naszych żołnierzy uczestniczących w zagranicznych misjach. Poniżej prezentuję artykuł autorstwa amerykańskiego badacza Lee Gerdesa dot. wykorzystania BIOFEEDBACKU w działaniach terapeutycznych osób z PTSD.

Z Szacunkiem

Dariusz Wyspiański



"PTSD: How to put your thinking brain back in charge

Lee Gerdes

As a friend of mine is given to say, "none of us gets out of this life alive." Top of mind today are the soldiers and others who are valiantly fighting for our freedom. They have chosen an endeavor where danger, crisis and trauma surround them. But in life – as in war – there are no unwounded soldiers. Our police and firefighters experience physical and psychological wounds each day. Those of us going through life in a more "ordinary" way – mothers, fathers, bankers, laborers, athletes, children – also face our share of challenges. For many of us, the scar tissue grows, but for far too many of us, the pain doesn't heal.
It is a rare individual who escapes the travails of severe trauma. Traumas can be physical or emotional. They can happen before birth, at birth, or anywhere along the way.

My own work with Brainwave Optimization™ began when I experienced trauma – four youth with a baseball bat assaulted me when I was locking a churchyard gate. For nearly a decade, I was a prisoner of PTSD: jumpy, irritable, quick to anger, headache-y, sweaty at night, hope-deprived, and sleepless. I was increasingly detached and depressed. I tried everything you can think of with very little relief. Throughout it all, I knew that the person I had become was not the real me. That's when the search for a solution began.

Nearly every one of our 35,000 clients today comes to us as a result of trauma. They ostensibly come to us for addictions, depression, anxiety or stress, sleeplessness, impaired thinking, chronic pain or concussion – but in the end, all of these are the result of a trauma - or several traumas. Many think they are abnormal or weak; some even have been told they are "crazy" – or to just get over it. When we are able to show them a picture of their brainwave patterns, there is often tremendous relief that the cause has been identified – and even more so when they understand that there's a likely solution.

When we begin to understand brain functioning, we begin to understand that not all PTSD is alike. Some of us have an escalated parasympathetic nervous system that causes us to go into a freeze response. This is because we have experienced a trauma of abandonment; a situation we could do nothing about. Perhaps in war, it was being near a buddy who was killed and not being able to do anything about it. In life, it can be emotional detachment from an alcoholic parent.

Others of us have a heightened sympathetic nervous system that causes us to go into fight-or-flight behaviors. This is because we experienced a trauma of infringement; one in which something or someone threatened or abused us to the point we wanted to fight back or run away. The majority of people with PTSD are sympathetic dominant.

Either way, the brain assumes the patterns it needs to survive - the nervous system responds and physical and emotional disruption occur as automatic responses from the brain.

I am living proof that this is a prison you can escape. But not with "outside-in" treatments like pills, alcohol, marijuana, talking about it, or physical exercises that excite the sympathetic system.

The most harmful of current "treatments" are exposure therapy or virtual reality exposure therapy. Contrary to some long-held beliefs, re-living the trauma does not make it go away. In most cases, it only serves to further embed the trauma, and hence, the destructive patterns. We see this as plain as day when we look at brainwave patterns and view the degree of functional imbalance caused by these modalities.

It's only in very recent years, that science has come to understand the brain's role on behavior. With Brainwave Optimization, we focus on the role of the brain in one's ability to regulate behaviors. It was only in 1998 that a researcher (Panskepp) connected neural structures with specific emotional systems. From there, others like Stephen Porges and Peter Sterling began to understand that it was not only those internal connections, but also how readily we were able to adjust our behavior to the situation at hand that made all the difference.

Brainwave Optimization understands what's going on inside the brain that drives certain behaviors and increase the brains resilience so it can adapt to external demands.

The only way to escape the prison is to directly and effectively address the source of the issue – your brain. According to a 2004 study by Cloitre, et al, "routine psychiatric interventions are quite ineffective in helping people manage their emotions and the best that medications generally can do is dull emotional arousal of any kind, thereby robbing people of pain and pleasure simultaneously."

Returning soldiers, veterans from prior wars, those who have been raped, abused or assaulted – or who have witnessed an assault or death – often do not want to talk about it. That's your brain protecting you; telling you not to talk about it. With Brainwave Optimization, there is no need to talk. You relax in a chair while your brain "speaks" to itself. In fact, we help you "get your head out of the way so your brain can do the work."

We have made huge steps in just the past decade in understanding the brain. It is time for us now to step out of age-old "treatments" that just don't work. New knowledge calls for radical shifts in how we heal ourselves – and ultimately, how we heal the world around us..."

NEUROPSYCHOTERAPIA

May. 14th, 2013

BIOFEEDBACK - udostępniona praca magisterska

SzanownI Państwo,

W sieci została udostępniona praca magisterska autorstwa Pani DOMINIKI RAUDZIS, dotycząca fundamentów BIOFEEDBACKU.
Stanowi ona wartościowy zbiór naukowo zweryfikowanych informacji o podstawach tej nauki i praktyki terapeutycznej
Załączam link do pracy :
http://www.fizjoterapeutom.pl/attachments/article/382/Biofeedback%20-%20praca%20mgr%20Dominika%20Raudzis.pdf

Z Szacunkiem

D.Wyspiański

NEUROPSYCHOTERAPIA

Mar. 13th, 2013

Filozoficzna podbudowa BIOFEEDBACKU....

Bhagavad_Gita_1_1_2013

Szanowni Państwo,
Pozwalam sobie na zaprezentowanie artykułu autorstwa p.SAROJA SHARMY z indyjskiego BANARAS HINDU UNIVERSITY. Autor łączy założenia hinduizmy i jogi, z fundamentami praktyki BIOFEEDBACKU. Jest to niewątpliwie ciekawe podejście, choć z pewnością tradycje hinduistyczne nie są jedynym fundamentem filozoficznym BIOFEEDBACKU - wręcz przeciwnie, uważam że każda kultura może w swym duchowym dziedzictwie odwołać się do tradycji medytacji, kontemplacji i technik oddechowych stabilizujących pracę organizmu.
Fizjologiczny komponent tego rodzaju praktyk ukierunkowany na utrzymanie homeostazy procesów fizjologicznych, stanowi naturalne odwołanie się do współczesnych, naukowo uzasadnionych praktyk NEUROTERAPII i BIOFEEDBACKU

Z Szacunkiem

Dariusz Wyspiański


PHILOSOPHICAL BASIS OF BIOFEEDBACK

SAROJ SHARMA

Department of Basic Principles Institute of Medical Sciences,

Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi – 221 005.

ABSTRACT: Modern Biofeedback Technique is the implementation of psychosomatic

interrelationship in respect to health and disease, the psychophysical principle is utilized for

psychosomatic self regulation. The basic concept of biofeedback training are well considered in

the Vedas, and Yoga system of Indian philosophy. The concept of biofeedback training depends

on the ancient philosophical concept of mindbody integration.

INTRODUCTION

According to modern “Biofeedbacktraining” various psychosomatic diseases

like hypertension headache asthma backache etc. can be treated and controlled with self

control, self regulation and meditation. Biofeedback training reconnects the mindbody and spirit. It makes a person aware that he is alone responsible for the

maintenance and control of his own health.Meditation and relaxation have been used in a number of clinical studies to achieve areductions in blood pressure in patients

suffering from essential hypertension, gladman et al (1973) and green et al (1974-

1977) studied the significance of biofeedback training for anxiety and tension,

reduction. These workers observed significant physiological change following

specific feedback therapy. The success of biofeedback training depends on creating a

harmonious interaction of the mind andbody. During the process of biofeedback therapy, it has been observed that pulse rate, plod pressure and muscle tone can be significantly reduced by continuous practice of meditation was beneficial in the reduction

of nervousness, insomnia irritability pulserate and heart-disease.

Continuous practice of meditation reduced the frequency and intensity of angina pain in

comparison to drug therapy group. The use of biofeedback meditation and other yogic practices may provide useful means of altering physiological response assumed to

be associated with complex psychological process in psychosomatic disorders.

Udupa et al (1978) also noticed a significant improvement following savasana therapy in hypertension cases. Bhagvad gita has also laid emphasis on self control, self-regulation

of various sense-organs. The purification of mind has been considered most important

for spiritual development gita repeatedly claims that evil effect of desires and

attachments, anger and greed as the three gates of hell.

Bhagavad Gita

Bhagavad gita advocates the necessity for

self-purification. If is only possible by the

purification of body, mind in tellect and

sense-organs (Gita V.II). All the objects of

the sense organs are the root cause of

miseries of the world. (Gita IX, 33). The

lack of awareness of reality, the sense of

Pages 240 - 243

2

egoism or ‘I am-ness’, attractions and repulsions

towards objects and the strong

desire for life are the great afflictions which

are responsible for all the miseries of life.

Brown (1970), Kamiya (1968) and Nowvis

(1970) observed that many persons report

entering a ‘Quasimeditational state of

consciousness during alpha enhacement

feedback. According to Jackson beatly et al

this state of consciousness often called the

‘alpha experience’ is said to be a pleasant ,

relaxed and serene state characterized by a

loss of body and time awareness, an absence

of thought and egolessness. This state is

similar to ‘Sthitprajna’ of Bhagvad gita.

Excessive desire for material things anger,

grief, greed, fear and excessive exhilaration

effect the bodily humors resulting in various

diseases like hypertension, coronary heart

disease, autoimmune disease etc. Indian

philosophy has reportedly emphasized the

significance of excessive material

possession as the root cause of stress and

strain which ultimately effect mind and

body. Both modern scientists and ancient

philosophers advocate that many

psychological factors like lust (Kama), fear

(Bhaya), sorrow (Soka), jeolousy (Irsya),

anger Krodha) anxiety (Cinta), guilt

(Manoglani) frustration (Nairasya),

depression (Sattva- hani), and mental fatigue

(Mansika srama) have been included as

precipitating factors of psychosomatic

disorders.

Influence of Yoga

The basic concept of biofeedback is mainly

related to yoga system of India philosophy.

The object of Yoga sutra is cittvrittinirodh.

In other words Yoga is the inhibition of the

modification of mind. In order to control

citta or (mind) Patanjali has told eight fold

means of Yoga. The eight-fold methods of

yoga as emumerated in Yoga sutra are (1)

Yama (restraints) (2) Niyama or the

principles of he development of the

personality, (3) Asana or bodily postures, (4)

pranayama or breath control, (5) Pratyahara

or the withdrawl of the senses, (6) Dharna

or attention (7) Dhyana or meditation, (8)

Samadhi or concentration, asanas advocate

the adaptation of various bodily postures

conducive to bodily health, mental

equilibrium and spiritual development.

Pranayama is a method to regulate the

breathing and thus one can control the

physiological process. Pratyahara is the

withdrawl of the senses from the wordly

objects, In brief pratyahara is a technique of

controlling senses by mind. Dharana means

holding the object of attention before the

mind dhyana is the contemplation of the

object without any break or disturbance,

thoughtless stage of mind is Samadhi stage.

A sadhaka who practices Samadhi is not

aware of any object except the object of

meditation. There is no cognition in the act

of awareness. It is at this stage that the yogi

is capable of stopping all the vrittis of the

citta Yoga vasistha has given maximum

importance on breath control, self criticism

and observance of right conduct in order to

achieve the state of complete bliss.

Yoga is a technique for the path of selfrealization.

It is aimed at obtaining

liberation through perfect control of body

and mind.

In yoga sutra (11:15), Patanjali has advised

that pranayama should be practiced

regularly to attain good meditation, normal

heath and mental peace. A mental stress is

reflected upon the body through the nervous

system and therapy produces somatic

manifestations, a mental stress can bring

even organic changes in the body. Various

mental and somatic disease can be avoided

and a perfect balance between mind and

Pages 240 - 243

3

body can be attained by the practice of

various exercises described in patanjali yoga

sutra (I:34). According to Vedanta mental

diseases are the end result of the imbalance

of the rajas and tama while somatic diseases

arise due to imbalanace of the tridosa-vata,

pitta and kapha. The mind is the cause of

bondange and liberation. The mind acts as

director and co-ordinator of the ten senseorgans

of the body. Vedanta accepts a close

inter-relationship and inter dependence of

the body and mind.

Patel et al (1975) also observed significant

fall in blood pressure following Yoga and

biofeedback therapy. Benson et al (1974)

and Shapiro (1976) had made extensive

attempt to regulate the complete

psychological process by biofeedback

therapy. Jain and Buddhism also accepted

the importance of self control and selfpurification

for the attainment of highest

object of life which leads to moksa.

CONCLUSIONS

In brief Indian philosophy forms the basis of

further investigation in the field of

psychology and medicine. Te approach of

biofeedback involves many disciplines and

the main areas of discussion in this context

are states of consciousness, creativity

imagination attention and vigilance ancient

Indian thinkers have laid emphasis on the

analysis of inner self which develops

capabilities of analysing the wordly

miseries, the main object of meditation,

relaxation and self regulation is to evolve

human personality form jada to pure and

fine consciousness.

To conclude, due to the resurgence of

interest in self-exploration and self

realization, it will be possible to develop a

synthesis of ancient Indian philosophy and

biofeedback training as tools for self

regulation.

Biofeedback theory is the application of

Indian philosophy in the modern science and

technology, it is evident that biofeedback

training depends on the ancient

philosophical concept of mind –body

integration. Mind –body is not divided.

Ancient and modern scholars have accepted

that physical and mental aspects of life do

not stand in isolation but are skillfully

blended into a harmonious whole.

NEUROPSYCHOTERAPIA

Dec. 19th, 2012

Oni stosują BIOFEEDBACK - "VANCOUVER CANUCKS" (NHL)

canucks
"Vancouver Canucks" - National Hockey League Elite Team from Canada

Drodzy Państwo,

Do grona profesjonalistów sportowych z "górnej pólki" dołaczył jakiś czas temu hokejowy "team" VANCOUVER CANUCKS z Kanady. Poniżej, krótki opis metodologii neuroterapeutycznej z jakiej korzystają.

Z Szacunkiem

Dariusz Wyspiański



"Vancouver Canucks Race to the Stanley Cup – Is it all in their Minds?

The Vancouver Canucks National Hockey League team just made it into the Stanley Cup Finals for the first time in almost 20 years. The Canucks, under the direction of sports psychologist Len Zaichkowski, have been using a new state of the art technology called the Mind Room. The Mind Room (using instruments from Thought Technology) uses biofeedback and neurofeedback instruments to assess and train athletes to control their stress and attention in competitive situations. The Canucks have several older players who are performing at their highest levels more consistently. Professional and Olympic athletes have been using biofeedback and neurofeedback for years to achieve successful performance outcomes. Athletes from the National Football League, World Cup Soccer, Major League Baseball and numerous Olympic Teams (Indian Shooting, Canadian Skiing) have utilized biofeedback and neurofeedback to gain championships in their sports.

Biofeedback uses physiological measures of muscle tension (EMG), skin perspiration (GSR), temperature , respiration and heart rate variability. Neurofeedback, or EEG biofeedback assesses unhealthy brainwave (EEG) patterns to determine if an athlete is anxious, in the peak attention zone or over-focused and trains their brain to be able to maintain the optimal pattern required for peak performance. The Mind Room combines biofeedback and neurofeedback measures with game video that can be used to train several athletes at one. In addition, using the Mind Room concepts, players are less like to suffer severe injuries and recover from these injuries, including concussions, more quickly and with better long-term results. These training benefits result in greater player performance and durability, often resulting in Olympic Gold Metals and Team Championships.

The use of biofeedback and neurofeedback are becoming more frequent in sport psychology, especially in the area of concussion assessment (using QEEG assessment) and treatment. Athletes in contact sports, especially hockey and football are increasingly experiencing concussions which not only can significantly interfere with their teams success (i.e. Sidney Crosby in the NHL), but also negatively affect their future sport success and life health.

Additional information is available in a book to be released in June 2011 called “Applications of Biofeedback & Neurofeedback in Sport Psychology” edited by Ben Strack, Ph.D. and Michael Linden, Ph.D., published by the Association of Applied Physiology and Biofeedback (www.aapb.org).

Dr. Linden is a Clinical Psychologist and Nationally Certified in Neurofeedback and Biofeedback. He is the director of The Attention Learning Center, which has offices located in San Juan Capistrano, Irvine and Carlsbad, California."


NEUROPSYCHOTERAPIA

Nov. 6th, 2012

SAMURAJSKI MIECZ NARZĘDZIEM BIOFEEDBACKU...?

Iaido_hands

Szanowni Państwo,

Niniejszym pozwalam sobie na zacytowanie niezwykle błyskotliwego artykułu pochodzącego z wortalu "Martial Art Development". Autor porównuje praktykę "drogi miecza" z technikami BIOFEEDBACKU. Dla mnie, zarówno jako Neuroterapeuty, jak i Budoki na codzień obcującego z samurajskim mieczem, artykuł ten brzmi niezwykle trafnie i wiarygodnie.
Praktyka miecza jest drogą prowadzącą do poczucia harmonii i psychofizjologicznej homeostazy. Adept "sztuki miecza" (kenjutsu; iaido) posługując się swym orężem doskonale, poprzez czucie kinestetyczno-ruchowe, wyczuwa jakość swego ruchu. Miecz "przekazuje" sygnały na temat stopnia zharmonizowania ruchu, jego zgodności z przyjętym i oczekiwanym wzorcem.
Warto dodać, iż formy treningu indywidualnego z mieczem (kata), mają charakter doświadczeń absolutnie transowych, w toku których następuje pełna homeostaza organizmu i stan w psychologii pozytywnej znany jako FLOW ("Przepływ"). Analogia do efektu równowagi psychofizjologicznej, jakiej doświadcza się w toku treningu BIOFEEDBACK, jest więc oczywista, czego autor niniejszego bloga wielokrotnie doświadczył...

Z Szacunkiem

Dariusz Wyspiański



"The Secret of The Talking Sword
Source "Martial Art Development" website

When learning the art of the sword, we are often told that we should wield it as an extension of our own body. The sword’s edge and tip should exhibit all the speed, power and grace of the hand that holds it, for instance. That is a fine objective—but what if the hand has no speed, power or grace to start with?

According to one classical perspective, no student should be given sword instruction until they have first qualified themselves to learn, by demonstrating mastery of barehanded technique. In some styles of martial arts, this might require thousands of hours of study.

Narrowing the focus during these initial months, or years of training might seem to benefit everyone involved. It can, and frequently it does. However, in some cases, it will actually hinder the student’s overall progress. The sword itself is an excellent instructor, to those who will heed its lessons.

What is Biofeedback?
Biofeedback is a method of expanding conscious awareness into realms that are typically governed by the unconscious mind. The subject of biofeedback training is instrumented with equipment that amplifies, records and displays biometric data, such as body temperature, heart rate, and skin conductivity. Experiments have shown that, if a subject is made aware of small fluctuations in these ostensibly involuntary processes (i.e. with the help of biofeedback equipment), that subject can more easily bring these processes under their conscious control.

Biofeedback machines, such as an electroencephalograph (EEG) or digital thermometer, can be expensive and complex. They can also be simple and cheap. Bicycle training wheels, which allow a rider to tip over slightly without immediately falling down, provide a useful form of biometric feedback. In fact, an intelligent person can press nearly any tool into service as a biofeedback device—including their sword.

The Sword as Biofeedback Device
A sword is a natural amplifier, which consistently and impartially reflects the mistakes of its user. If the swordsman’s grip and cut are incorrect, his sword may wobble, or even ring. When the position of his wrist is wrong by one inch, the tip of the blade may be wrong by one foot. If his body movement is slightly convoluted or imprecise, a good sword helps to make that obvious; with a tassel, even more so.

According to an old Chinese proverb, “A one-inch error at the start becomes a thousand-mile error by the end.” A sword can help prevent small errors from escaping its user’s attention, and thereby train the hand that holds it, and the mind which directs it..."

NEUROPSYCHOTERAPIA

Sep. 19th, 2012

BIOFEEDBACK jako narzędzie treningu mentalnego profesjonalnych sportowców

London+Olympic+Games+2012+Opening+Ceremony+TJLsu1oFoJ3l

Drodzy Państwo,

Pozwalam sobie na przedstawienie krótkiego artykułu, po raz kolejny wskazującego na przydatność BIOFEEDBACKU w mentalnym treningu sportowców z absolutnie najwyższego poziomu wyczynu.

Pozostaję z Szacunkiem

Dariusz Wyspiański



"BIOFEEDBACK in Sports
(bio-medical.com)

Biofeedback training has been widely recognized as an excellent way to promote a relaxed state for many sports applications. Many studies have been done on using biofeedback as a method of relaxation and to increase performance.

Athletes should ask themselves “Can I perform better in a relaxed state?” If it is the bottom of the ninth, with the bases loaded, the athlete needs to be able to clear their mind and focus on the performance. Anxiety and high stress can cause many athletes to “choke” in clutch situations. By learning to alter their mental and physiological state with a few simple relaxation techniques they tend to perform better. Biofeedback devices are great tools in achieving these results.

There have been several Olympic athletes, NHL hockey teams, professional football teams, golfers and more, that have credited biofeedback training as a factor in their success.

Some teams have even set up mental training centers where trainers monitor the brainwaves and other physical functions such as surface EMG, temperature, GSR, heart rate, and respiration. This helps the players learn to reduce performance anxiety and improve their ability to focus under stress – giving them the “mental edge” they need to win.

There are devices like the Resperate, that promote meditative breathing patterns and very simple to use items such as the GSR2, that measures minute changes in skin conductance or resistance and conveys the stress level by an audio tone. These devices are easy to use and very effective. Organizations and teams have also used more sophisticated systems that measure multiple physiological measurements at once for a picture of the body’s stress level.

More recently there are products being introduced to help speed up reaction time. Reaction time can be crucial in many sporting events and in the Olympics millisecond can be the difference between gold and bronze..."

NEUROPSYCHOTERAPIA

Jul. 9th, 2012

BIOFEEDBACK jako narzędzie optymalizacji efektywności psychofizjologicznej KOSZYKARZY





Szanowni Państwo,

Tytułem doniesień z badań pozwalam sobie na zacytowanie artykułu, który ukazał się w "Asian Journal of Sports Medicine", Volume 3 (Number 1), March 2012. Jego autorami są : Maman Pang, Kanupriya Garg oraz Jaspal Singh Sandu. Artykuł dotyczy badań nad wykorzystaniem technik HRV BIOFEEDBACKU do optymalizacji sprawności psychofizjologicznej wprost przekładającej się na efektywność sportową koszykarzy.

Poniżej załączam abstract artykułu.

Z Szacunkiem

Dariusz Wyspiański


Role of Biofeedback in Optimizing Psychomotor Performance in Sports
Maman Paul; Kanupriya Garg; Jaspal Singh Sandhu, PhD

Abstract

Purpose: Biofeedback is an emerging tool to acquire and facilitate physiological and psychological domains of the human body like response time and concentration. Thus, the present study aims at determining the reconstitution of psychomotor and performance skills in basketball players through biofeedback training.
Methods: Basketball players (N=30) with different levels of expertise (university, state and national) aged 18-28 years (both male and female) were randomly divided into 3 equal groups - Experimental group, Placebo group and Control group. The experimental group received Heart Rate Variability Biofeedback training for 10 consecutive days for 20 minutes that included breathing at individual’s resonant frequency through a pacing stimulus; Placebo group was shown motivational video clips for 10 consecutive days for 10 minutes, whereas Control group was not given any intervention. At session
1, 10 and 1month follow up, heart rate variability, respiration rate, response time (reaction and movement time), concentration and shooting performance were assessed.
Results: Two way repeated measure ANOVA was used to simultaneously compare within and between group differences. Response time, concentration, heart rate variability, respiration rate and shooting differences were statistically significant in each group along with interaction of group and timen (P<0.001). Also, all the measures showed statistically significant inter group difference (P<0.05).
Conclusion: The results of the study suggest that biofeedback training may help to train stressed athletes to acquire a control over their psychophysiological processes, thus helping an athlete to perform maximally..."


Jun. 21st, 2012

BIOFEEDBACK W PRAKTYCE PSYCHOLOGA SPORTU




  Szanowni Państwo,

 PhD Corydon Hammond z University of UTAH - School of Medicine jest autorem artykułu: "NEUROFEEDBACK FOR THE ENHANCEMENT OF ATHLETIC PERFORMANCE AND PHYSICAL BALANCE", który jakiś czas temu ukazał się na łamach "The Journal of The American Board of Sport Psychology".
Artykuł dotyczy potwierdzenia efektywności Neuroterapii w kontekście terapii zaburzeń poczucia równowagi.

Poniżej przedstawiam kluczowe konkluzje ww. artykułu


Z Szacunkiem

Dariusz Wyspiański

"NEUROFEEDBACK FOR THE ENHANCEMENT OF ATHLETIC PERFORMANCE AND PHYSICAL BALANCE"
Ph D Corydon Hammond

"Sport psychologists will find that neurofeedback is a cutting-edge technology that holds potential for improving concentration and attention, lowering anxiety and disruptive mental chatter, and in assisting in the rehabilitation of effects from concussions and mild head injuries. The author’s experiences in treating patients with serious balance problems and observing their rapid improvements provides encouraging evidence for the potential neurofeedback to enhance physical balance in sports such as gymnastics, skiing,ice skating, hockey, skateboarding, and snowboarding. The rapid effects of this balance protocol make it particularly appealing. It is hoped that sport psychologists will experiment with applying this protocol with athletes and that controlled research will beconducted...."

 

Jun. 5th, 2012

BIOFEEDBACK w połączeniu z TRENINGIEM AUTOGENNYM, skutecznym narzędziem w walce z migreną






Szanowni Państwo,

"Korean Medical Science" zaprezentował artykuł dotyczący badań grupy naukowców z Wydziału Psychiatrii Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, badających efektywnośc połaczenia terapii BIOFEEDBACK z TRENINGIEM AUTOGENNYM, jako "zestawu narzędzi" terapeutycznych w leczeniu migren u kobiet. Przeprowadzone badania skłaniają ku ciekawym wnioskom wskazującym, iż w przypadku połaczonej terapii BIOFEEDBACK & TRENING AUTOGENNY, efektywność dot redukcji nasilenia migren stwierdzono u ponad 50% pacjentek.

Z Szacunkiem

Dariusz Wyspiański



Źródło: J Korean Med Sci. 2009 Oct;24(5):936-40. Kang EH, Park JE, Chung CS, Yu BH. Department of Psychiatry, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.




Apr. 27th, 2012

BIOFEEDBACK, PSYCHOLOGIA HUMANISTYCZNA oraz PSYCHOFIZJOLOGIA w pracy z Rodziną





Szanowni Państwo,

Dziś pozwalam sobie na dołączenie linku do archiwalnego artykułu z roku 1976, pochodzacego z kanadyjskiego magazynu medycznego : CAN. FAM. PHYSICIAN 22:1449 NOVEMBER, 1976;
zatytułowanego :"Biofeedback, Humanistic Psychology and Psychosomatics In Family Practice"

LINK : http://ukpmc.ac.uk/articles/PMC2378396/pdf/canfamphys00320-0091.pdf

Warto zadedykować chwilę refleksji praktykom terapeutycznym, które w Kanadzie stosowane są od prawie 40 lat...



Z Szacunkiem

Dariusz Wyspiański



Mar. 6th, 2012

BIOFEEDBACK "PEAK PERFORMANCE TRAINING" jako metoda wykorzystywana w pracy z wyczynowymi sportowcami





Szanowni Państwo,

Kontynuując tematykę związaną z zagadnieniami dotyczącymi praktyki BIOFEEDBACKU, pozwalam sobie na przytoczenie rezultatów badań przeprowadzonych przez Anete Demerdzievą oraz Nade Pop-Jordanova z University Pediatric Clinic, Faculty of Medicine, University “Ss Kiril and Metodij”, Skopje, Macedonia.
Przedstawione przykłady przez badaczki z Macedonii dotyczą wykorzystania BIOFEEDBACKU kilku modalności jako narzędzia "doskonalenia mentalnego" sportowców wyczynowych (kadra narodowa narciarzy alpejskich).

Zachęcam do zapoznania się z wynikami tych obiecujących badań.

Z Szacunkiem

Dariusz Wyspiański



"Biofeedback Training for Peak Performance in Sport - Case Study"
Nada Pop-Jordanova and Aneta Demerdzieva
University Pediatric Clinic, Faculty of Medicine, University “Ss Kiril and Metodij”, Skopje, Republic of Macedonia

Abstract
The use of peripheral biofeedback and neurofeedback is growing rapidly in sport psychology. The
aim is to lower competition stress, anxiety, and muscle tension.
We present a case report concerned to biofeedback training in an athlete in preparation to Olympic
Game competition. It is the first case in our region to prepare athlete with biofeedback modalities.
Obtained results are very encouraging.

Results
Sport psychologist describe biofeedback as an important tool in: (1) helping an athlete learn to control activation level (2) helping him to manage emotions and mood swings and (3) ultimately assuring physiological readiness of the body for optimum performance.
The most common biofeedback modalities that sport psychologists used include HR, respiration,
temperature training, EMG, EDR and EEG. Unfortunately there is not much definitive information about specific protocols and selected parameters to use with different sports.
The psychological preparation of athletes for competition could be described as “taking the brain to the weight room”. That is, the athletes are being mentally conditioned to withstand the rigors of fatigue, time pressure, undue expectations, and crowd pressure to give them the
possibility of meeting or exceeding their performance goals. Beside psychological support, biofeedback technology and skills training should be an integral part of a training regiment. Competition stress, anxiety, and muscle tension are common antecedents of performance.
Through biofeedback, the athlete can objectively assess and control these variables in the long run.
Another area where neurofeedback may hold potential for improving athletic performance is in facilitating greater physical balance. Namely, improvements in balance might enhance performance, skiing, ice skating, hockey, skateboarding, snowboarding, ballet, and possibly also in
tennis, martial arts*, basketball, baseball, and football.
In the presented case, psychological support together with peripheral biofeedback and neurofeedbak
showed very successful outcome. Our client achieved stabilization of emotional arousal which has been the main brake of the success. He obtained improved results, won at Olympic Games.
By this, we have confirmed the usefulness of biofeedback in sport psychology with potential for improving concentration and attention, lowering anxiety and disruptive
mental chatter.

To our knowledge, this is the first time in this Europe region that biofeedback is used for sports...."

*My personal researches also confirmed this thesis - remark :D.Wyspianski



Jan. 9th, 2012

Zastosowanie terapii HRV BIOFEEDBACK w pracy nad wzmacnianiem odporności emocjonalnej sportowców







Szanowni Państwo,

Z ogromną przyjemnościa prezentuję podsumowanie wyników badań dr Cynthii J. Tanis („Capella University” USA), dot. efektów zastosowania oddziaływań HRV BIOFEEDBACKU w procesach stymulowania emocjonalnej regulacji sportowców, zwiększania odporności na stres - badania dot. kobiecej drużyny siatkarek „Capella University”.

Z Szacunkiem

Dariusz Wyspiański



Ph D Cynthia J. Tanis
Capella University


“THE EFFECTS OF HEART RHYTHM VARIABILITY BIOFEEDBACK
WITH EMOTIONAL REGULATION ON THE ATHLETIC PERFORMANCE
OF WOMEN COLLEGIATE VOLLEYBALL PLAYERS


Conclusions:

(a) Learning about biofeedback and selfregulation
while visualizing the heart rhythm on the computer screen.
(b) Improving selfawareness
and increasing self-control.
(c) Reducing the effects of physical and mental
stress relating to academic and athletic rigors.
(d) Experiencing enhanced physical and
mental states.
(e) Improving academic and athletic performance.
(f) Enriching team composure and camaraderie.

Sport psychology personnel, coaches, and athletic trainers
are qualified practitioners for implementing heart rhythm variability biofeedback in sport.
Furthermore, this intervention has the potential to enhance academic and athletic
performance for collegiate athletes…”


Dec. 21st, 2011

Oni stosują BIOFEEDBACK - Kobe BRYANT, Lance ARMSTRONG, Shaun WHITE



Shaun White - idol SKATEBOARDINGU i SNOWBOARDINGU


Lance Armstrong - kolarski Arcymistrz


Kobe Bryant - legenda NBA

Szanowni Państwo,

Oto przykłady kolejnych absolutnych GWIAZD SPORTU, regularnie wykorzystujących techniki BIOFEEDBACKU różnych modalności w pracy nad budowaniem mentalnej dyspozycji.
KOBE BRYANT - megagwiazdor zawodowej koszykówki NBA, LANCE ARMSTRONG - jeden z najlepszych Mistrzów Kolarskich w historii tej dyscypliny i SHAUN WHITE - NOWY IDOL sportów alternatywnych, mianem których określa się niekiedy ekstremalny SKATEBOARDING i SNOWBOARDING

Z Szacunkiem

Dariusz Wyspiański


Oto kilka informacji pochodzących z Centrum Biofeedbacku "MOONVIEW SANCTUARY" w USA :


"Athletes who Excel with Peak Performance Training

Home / Optimal Performance / Athletes who Excel with Peak Performance Training
There are certain athletes who raise the bar in terms of performance. Their excellence and consistency stands as a shining example of what the human body can achieve if properly trained. The following athletes could all be used as examples in a peak performance training program. In each of their respective sports, they excel on a consistent level and have raised the performance of those around them.

Kobe Bryant

Winner of multiple NBA titles and an Olympic gold medal, Kobe Bryant has achieved almost everything there is to achieve in the world of basketball. But still he pushes himself harder – always looking for that new shot, that extra edge that will keep him a step ahead of his rivals. His fellow Olympians in China said that Kobe’s level of intensity during practices was higher than that seen in most actual games.

Shaun White

The freewheeling snowboarder may seem like a fun-loving party guy, but in actuality he is a driven athlete who pushes himself every time he approaches the half-pipe. By constantly reinventing himself and using disciplines from a variety of sports, White is proving himself to be one of the 21st century’s first true champions.

Lance Armstrong

Imagine what it would take to win multiple Tour de France championships. Now think about how hard that would be after you had been diagnosed with cancer. That is exactly what Lance Armstrong has been able to accomplish – and now as he is poised for another comeback looks to try and rewrite the record books once more. Armstrong is a living, breathing example of what the human body can accomplish if the mind is willing. There is as much sports mental training that goes into his regimen as there is on the physical side.."


Dec. 11th, 2011

HRV BIOFEEDBACK jako czynnik wspierający efektywność sportową na przykładzie BASEBALLA




Szanowni Państwo,

Niedawno miałem okazję zapoznać się z wynikami badań dotyczących zastosowania terapii HRV BIOFEEDBACK w pracy nad zwiększeniem efektywności sportowej. Badania prowadzone były w USA i dotyczyły zagadnień redukcji lęku oraz wzrostu skutecznosci sportowej wsród BASEBALLISTÓW.
Abstract tego artykułu jest dostępny na stronach AMERICAN PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSOCIATION, mnie udało się dotrzeć do szerszego omównienia ww. badań. Poniżej pozwalam sobie na załączenie krótkiego streszczenia pochodzącego ze stron "APA".

Z Szacunkiem

Dariusz Wyspiański



"Effect of heart rate variability (hrv) biofeedback on batting performance in baseball.
AUTHOR : Benjamin William STRACK


The anxiety/arousal-performance relationship is one of the most widely researched areas in sport psychology. Although great strides have been made in the past few decades, the models that attempt to predict and explain the relationship and the interventions that have been developed and used in attempt to regulate anxiety and arousal for performance enhancement need further validation. The primary goal of this study was to investigate the effects of heart rate variability (HRV) biofeedback on batting performance in baseball. Forty-three varsity level high school baseball players participated in the study. Participants engaged in a competitive batting contest and a six-week biofeedback training protocol. Physiological stress profiles were conducted and participants were measured on batting performance scores and self-reports of state anxiety (CSAI-2), flow (FSS-2) and a visual analog scale (VAS) of how well the baseball was tracked visually. Results showed that participants who received training in HRV biofeedback improved significantly more in batting performance than control participants. In addition, batting performance percent improvement by group was calculated with the HRV biofeedback group showing a 60% improvement compared to a 21% improvement for the control group. Training participants also significantly increased the percent of total low frequency (LF) power in the heart rate spectrum. Predictions made for the VAS and subscales on the CSAI-2 were not confirmed. Partial support was found for the occurrence of the subjective state of flow. Results highlight the potential benefits of HRV biofeedback for performance enhancement with athletes. Implications for expanding current theory on the arousal/anxiety-performance relationship are discussed...."
(PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved)


Oct. 15th, 2011

INTELIGENCJA EMOCJONALNA - PRZYWÓDZTWO-BIOFEEDBACK



Szanowni Państwo,

Niniejszym pozwalam sobie zaprezentować esej będący fragmentem artykułu mego autorstwa, dotyczący zagadnień roli jaką Inteligencja Emocjonalna (EQ) odgrywa w efektywnym pełnieniu roli Przywódcy.
Pozwoliłem sobie na włączenie treści eseju do zagadnień tematycznych bloga poświęconego terapii BIOFEEDBACK, gdyż uważam, że techniki BIOFEEDBACKU mogą okazać się użyteczne w perspektywie rozwijania kompetencji emocjonalnych współczesnych przywódców, liderów, menedżerów.

Z Szacunkiem

Dariusz Wyspiański





INTELIGENCJA EMOCJONALNA JAKO ISTOTNY PARAMETR EFEKTYWNOŚCI WSPÓŁCZESNEGO MENEDŻERA

Dariusz Wyspiański


      Wymagania jakie przed współczesnymi menedżerami stawia gospodarka rynkowa, zdominowana przez globalizację, cykliczne kryzysy i stan permanentnej zmiany, znacząco wykraczają poza „klasyczne” kompetencje zarządcze rozumiane powszechnie jako „planowanie-organizowanie-motywowanie-kontrola”.
W dzisiejszym świecie pełnym sprzeczności, kluczowym parametrem efektywności menedżera jest zdolność do przewodzenia, zbudowania wokół siebie „kultury efektywności”, swoistej pozytywnej „aury”, która zagwarantuje zaangażowanie i koncentrację na osiąganiu wyników przez podwładnych.
Wspomina o tym min. Santorski, „Sednem przywództwa jest takie połączenie wewnętrznej siły i wyczucia emocji, by ludzie chcieli naturalnie za Tobą podążąć, zadzieje się to tylko dlatego że budzisz prawdziwy szacunek i respekt bazujący na pozytywnym rezonansie emocjonalnym, a nie strachu, zaślepieniu i złości” (Santorski, et al., 2011, str.5).

Umiejętność „wczuwania się w emocje podwładnych”, własna samokontrola emocjonalna, zdolność do budowania wokół siebie pozytywnej emocjonalnej aury jest fundamentem wielu współczesnych koncepcji przywództwa.
Michael Williams jest autorem koncepcji „przywództwa na bliską odległość”, która zakłada, iż „rolą menedżera jest tworzyć atmosferę umożliwiającą ludziom wykonanie tego w czym czują się najlepsi, ustawiczne doskonalenie się w pracy, w którą żarliwie wierzą. Podstawowe znaczenie w takiej charakterystyce ma imperatyw nakazujący gruntownie poznać każdego członka zespołu i zaangażować się na jego rzecz, tak aby zbudować zaufanie i pomagać ludziom osiągać maksimum ich możliwości”. (Williams, 2009, str 26).
Koncepcja Williamsa wpisuje się we współczesny trend badań nad przywództwem bazującym na osobistej wiarygodności menedżera, jako wykładni dla zbudowania efektywnej relacji z podwładnymi.
W teorii Wiliamsa, „przywództwo na bliską odległość” obejmuje następujące elementy : delegowanie, coaching, kształtowanie postaw i kierowanie ludźmi adekwatnie do sytuacji, pobudzanie nowych sposobów myślenia i działania, wyrażenie zgody na swobodę eksperymentowania, zwiększanie partycypacji i poczucia odpowiedzialności podwładnych. (Williams, str.27-28)
W opinii Williamsa, jednym z kluczowych parametrów osobowościowych umożliwiających efektywne zarządzanie „na bliską odległość” jest Inteligencja Emocjonalna.
Williams, definiuje pojęcie Inteligencji Emocjonalnej bazując na koncepcji Daniela Golemana.

Inteligencja Emocjonalna (EQ) jest to „zdolność do rozpoznawania uczuć własnych i innych osób w celu motywowania i umacniania siebie oraz innych, a także efektywnego zarządzania emocjami istniejącymi w nas i naszych relacjach” (Williams,  2009, str.36)

Przedstawiona powyżej definicja jest ogólnie pokrewna znaczeniowo z szerszym rozumieniem pojęcia EQ prezentowanym przez jednego z pionierów badań nad tym zagadnieniem – R.Bar-Ona.
W opinii Bar-Ona, Inteligencja Emocjonalna to „szereg pozapoznawczych zdolności, kompetencji i umiejętności, które umożliwiają człowiekowi efektywne radzenie sobie z naciskami środowiskowymi” (Bar-On, 1997, s.3)
Zdaniem Bar-Ona, Inteligencja Emocjonalna składa się z pięciu podstawowych grup kompetencji i komponentów:

Kompetencje intrapersonalne – samoświadomość emocjonalna, asertywność, samoakceptacja, szacunek dla własnej osoby, samoaktualizacja, niezależność.

• Kompetencje interpersonalne – empatia, zdolność do utrzymywania więzi z innymi ludźmi, odpowiedzialność społeczna.

• Kompetencje przystosowawcze – zdolność do rozwiązywania problemów, zdolność do konfrontowania subiektywnych doświadczeń z rzeczywistością, elastyczność przystosowawcza.

• Kompetencje związane z radzeniem sobie ze stresem – tolerancja na stres, samokontrola emocjonalna.

• Komponenty związane z ogólnym nastrojem – poczucie szczęścia, optymizm.

(Taracha, 2010, str. 65).

Bardziej zbliżone rozumienie pojęcia EQ, w stosunku do definicji tego pojęcia przedstawionej przez Williamsa, prezentują Salovey, Meyer i Caruso. „Inteligencja Emocjonalna to zdolność rozumienia własnych uczuć i uczuć innych ludzi oraz do wykorzystywania uczuć jako informacji i narzędzi do rozwiązywania różnorodnych problemów życiowych” (Trzebińska, 2008, str. 88).
Inteligencja Emocjonalna w koncepcji Salovey’a, Meyera i Caruso obejmuje cztery elementarne zdolności :
- do spostrzegania uczuć;
- do nazywania i wyrażania uczuć;
- do rozumienia przyczyn, konsekwencji i wzajemnych powiązań uczuć;
- do zarządzania uczuciami.


(Trzebińska, 2008, str. 88).


Michael Williams dostrzega oczywisty związek EQ, z efektywnością menedżerską realizowaną w ramach koncepcji „zarządzania na krótką odległość”.
„Menedżerowie i liderzy, którzy wyróżniają się wysoką Inteligencją Emocjonalną, zazwyczaj :

• Generują pozytywne emocje w relacjach z innymi ludźmi.

• Wyczuwają i dostrzegają ważne kwestie stanowiące tło danych interakcji.

• Rzetelnie tworzą klimat dobrej woli.

• Budują poprawne relacje, postępując świadomie, z empatią, konsekwentnie.
• Wywierają wpływ dzięki uczciwości osobistej i zawodowej.

• Doprowadzają do osiągania celów dzięki umiejętności zaangażowania innych na ich rzecz.”


(Williams, 2009, str.36-37)

Williams podkreśla, iż wysokie EQ, nie objawia się brakiem zdecydowania, uległością, czy submisyjnością menedżera. Wręcz przeciwnie, menedżer o wysokim EQ, to człowiek asertywny, którego motywację cechuje silna orientacja na cel.
Wysoki poziom Inteligencji Emocjonalnej menedżera ułatwia mu podejmowanie „trudnych” i niepopularnych decyzji w sposób konstruktywny i pozytywny, bez okazywania niechęci, frustracji, czy agresji.
„Zazwyczaj osoby takie :

• Mają jasno określone zasady i wartości, którym pozostają wierne.

• W swoich osądach i decyzjach wykazują się dużą samodyscypliną.

• Są wyjątkowo konsekwentne i uczciwe.

• Kwestionują i poddają pewne sprawy w wątpliwość, ale w atmosferze dociekania do ich sedna oraz pragnąc, by zaistniała sytuacja służyła postępowi i miała znaczenie edukacyjne.

• Bywają twórczo „szorstkie”, by prowokować do nowego (innego) sposobu myślenia i postępowania.

• Angażują się w krytyczne dysputy i dążą do dialogu, by uzgodnić wspólne rozumienie określonych problemów i zobowiązań przed podjęciem decyzji.


(Williams, 2009, str.37).


Wiliams odwołując się do badań Bagshawa akcentuje znaczenie samoświadomości jako kluczowej kompetencji emocjonalnej z perspektywy skutecznego zarządzania.
Samoświadomość polega na znajomości swoich mocnych i słabych stron, sensu przeżywanych uczuć i reakcji emocjonalnych występujących w różnych sytuacjach. Samoświadomość odgrywa ważną rolę w kontekście postępowania w relacjach innymi ludźmi. Stanowi niezbędną realistyczną podstawę pewności siebie połączoną z gotowością do ciągłego uczenia się i rozwoju zarówno w życiu jak i w roli przywódcy” (Williams, 2009, str. 39).
Williams powołując się na własne badania przeprowadzone w dziesięciu europejskich przedsiębiorstwach podkreśla, iż „przywództwo nie polega na niewolniczym trzymaniu się teoretycznie idealnego stylu zarządzania, ale na właściwym rozpoznaniu rzeczywistej sytuacji i elastycznym radzeniu sobie z nią.” (Williams, 2009, str. 41).

Lider o wysokim EQ to ktoś, kto rzetelnie, zręcznie i z większą niż inni ostrością dostrzega:

Drażliwe, pilne lub ważne kwestie, których nie wolno ignorować.
• Obszary potencjalnego konfliktu, które należy starać się zawczasu „rozbroić”.
• Niezbyt oczywiste powiązania, które mogą sugerować nowe możliwości lub potencjał.
• Luki w komunikacji i relacjach, które należy skutecznie zapełnić.

(Williams, 2009, str. 41-42).

Cooper i Sawaf akcentują podobne znaczenie kompetencji wynikających z EQ, przydatnych z perspektywy działalności menedżerskiej.
Inteligencja Emocjonalna to zdolność wyczucia, zrozumienia i skutecznego wykorzystania siły i dynamiki emocji jako źródła energii, informacji, budowania relacji i wpływu” (Cooper, Sawaf, 1998, str 37).

Koncepcja Williamsa zawiera nie tylko definicję pojęcia EQ z zaznaczeniem roli Inteligenci Emocjonalnej w procesie budowania standardów efektywnego przywództwa, ale i definiuje strukturę EQ.

W ujęciu Williamsa, EQ składa się z czterech poziomów:


Emocjonalnej świadomości – stanu świadomości własnych uczuć, odwagi bycia autentycznym, pragmatyzmu w wyrażaniu autentycznych emocji w relacjach z innymi.

Emocjonalnej uczciwości – zdolności do emocjonalnej szczerości zwłaszcza wobec siebie samego, osobistej wiarygodności słów i czynów, uczciwości emocji i intencji.

• Emocjonalnej kompetencji – wewnętrznej siły i wiary w siebie, intuicyjnej zdolności dopasowania emocjonalnego, empatii, samokontroli i zdolności do transformacji emocjonalnej - aktywnej kreacji pożądanych stanów emocjonalnych.

• Emocjonalnej synergii – zdolności do budowania atmosfery emocjonalnego zaufania, zdolności do świadomego kreowania pozytywnej atmosfery emocjonalnej, umiejętności przekazywania i przyjmowania autentycznych informacji zwrotnych.

(Williams, 2009, str. 184).

  Rozwinięciem przedstawionego przez Williamsa układu hierarchicznego EQ, mogą być poglądy Averilla (Averill, 2004, str. 46-54).
W ramach tej koncepcji wyróżniony zostaje najwyższy poziom EQ – poziom kreatywności emocjonalnej.
Poziom ten oznacza zdolność do kreowania emocjonalnej „aury”, wywołującej pozytywny rezonans emocjonalny powodujący, iż ludzie są gotowi podążać za liderem. Można powiedzieć, że jest to stan „zestrojenia emocjonalnego” pozwalającego na prowadzenie działań zespołu z autentyczną pasją i pełnią naturalnego zaangażowania pozytywnych emocji.
Kreacja emocjonalna pozwala menedżerowi na świadome wzbudzenie u podwładnych pozytywnych emocji, nie ma jednak znamion psychomanipulacji, wręcz przeciwnie - odwołuje się do standardów jakości relacji zbudowanej na pryncypiach wzajemnej uczciwości i osobistej wiarygodności menedżera.
Stany synergii i kreatywności emocjonalnej są istotne z perspektywy efektywności komunikacyjnej. Jacek Santorski (Santorski, 2011, str. 56), uważa że umiejętność kreowania emocjonalnej synergii (opartej na EQ), jest kluczem powodzenia w pracy psychoterapeuty.

       Zaprezentowana w niniejszym eseju koncepcja EQ autorstwa M.Williamsa zaliczana jest metodologicznie do tzw. „Mieszanych koncepcji Inteligencji Emocjonalnej”. Najbardziej znanym przedstawicielem tego nurtu jest cytowany wcześniej R.Bar-On.

      Teorie zaliczane do „mieszanych koncepcji EQ” nie są zbyt wysoko oceniane przez świat nauki. Często zarzuca się im chaos znaczeniowy polegający na włączaniu do treści pojęcia EQ różnorodnych elementów – postaw, emocji, funkcji poznawczych, nastawień, parametrów psychofizjologicznych (np. uwarunkowań temperamentalnych), złożonych konstruktów w stylu „dobrostanu” lub „szczęścia” itp.
Tak skonfigurowany konglomerat pojęciowy trudny jest do poddania spójnej metodologicznie i wiarygodnej empirycznie naukowej analizie.
Trudno odmówić racji zaprezentowanemu powyżej poglądowi, co jednak nie zmienia faktu, iż przedstawiona przez Williamsa „wizja” (wprawdzie w kontekście definicji EQ nie do końca spójna metodologicznie), jest inspirująca i ciekawa.

    W mojej ocenie jej ewidentnym atutem jest walor rozwojowy, wartościowy z perspektywy praktyków zarządzania.
Nie zgłębiając tajników metodologii naukowej, menedżer może w oparciu o wskazówki Williamsa rozwijać określony „pakiet” swoich emocjonalnych kompetencji z pożytkiem dla jakości budowania relacji z podwładnymi, prowadzących do uzyskania najwyższych standardów przywództwa, odwołującego się do osobistej wiarygodności.

- Gdzie jednak w tej koncepcji znajduje się odniesienie do BIOFEEDBACKU ?

W samej koncepcji nie ma bezpośredniego nawiązania do zagadnień BIOFEEDBACKU. Warto jednak pamiętać, iż techniki BIOFEEDBACKU różnych modalności, mogą wspierać proces rozwijania świadomości emocjonalnej (od samokontroli poczynając na świadomym zarządzaniu emocjami kończąc).
BIOFEEDBACK stanowić więc może niezwykle skuteczną „platformę operacyjną” dla samorozwoju emocjonalnego, swoisty „pierwszy krok” w odkrywaniu „klucza” do świadomego zarządzania własnymi emocjami, rozumienia ich znaczenia i wykorzystania w procesach budowania relacji interpersonalnych, kluczowych w biznesowych realiach praktycznego przywództwa.

Osobiście zachęcam do wykorzystania potencjału NEUROTERAPII (BIOFEEDBACKU) w pracy nad rozwojem własnej samokontroli i w dalszych etapach kształtowania świadomości emocjonalnej...


Dariusz Wyspiański



                                                                                                           

Oct. 2nd, 2011

BIOFEEDBACK W SPORCIE - badania kanadyjskich psychologów sportu - VANCOUVER 2010






Szanowni Państwo,

Mam przyjemność przedstawić artykuł autorstwa kanadyjskiego psychologa sportu Dr Pierre'a BEAUCHAMP.
Pierre Beauchamp wraz z żoną Marią (Doktorem psychologii i medycyny) stanowili tandem psychologów wspierających proces przygotowań olimpijskich kanadyjskich reprezentacji w łyżwiarstwie szybkim i konkurencjach biegowych narciarstwa klasycznego.
W ramach swoich działań ukierunkowanych na zbudowanie optimum mentalnej gotowości do osiągania wyników, wykorzystywali BIOFEEDBACK jako jedno z kluczowych narzędzi tzw. "PEAK PERFORMANCE", a więc osiągania najwyższej gotowości psychicznej do sportowej walki.
Swoje przemyślenia zawarli w poniższym artykule, nadając mu szeroki kontekst uogólnień wartościowych z perspektywy pracy psychologa sportu.

Zachęcam do lektury !


Z Szacunkiem

Dariusz Wyspiański




"Winning Performance Using biofeedback for sport psychology and better athletic training

By Pierre Beauchamp, PhD, and Marla K. Beauchamp, MScPT, PhD(c)

As a mental performance consultant, I have witnessed firsthand the evolution of sport psychology services through working with various athletic teams and organizations including the Canadian Olympic Association, the Aerial and Mogul Ski Teams in the Salt Lake 2002 Olympic Games, Speedskating and Ski-Cross Canada in preparation for the 2010 Vancouver Olympic Games, and most recently with Para-Cycling Canada in preparation for the London 2012 Games.

Consequently, I have had the opportunity to familiarize Olympic athletes with a range of sport psychology programs, and specifically, to introduce biofeedback training that facilitates the self-regulation and mindfulness of athletes that ultimately allows them to perform on demand and under pressure. The primary aim of this article is to introduce the field of applied psychophysiology to the greater sports medicine community, using my work with Speedskating Canada as an example.

Enhancing Mindfulness

The rationale for biofeedback interventions in the athletic population is based on the psycho-physiological principle that states that every physiological change is accompanied by a corresponding change in the mental and emotional state. Conversely, the opposite is also true-change in thoughts or emotions will have a corresponding effect on the individual's physiology.1

Consequently, biofeedback can be a powerful tool for self-regulation and for enhancing mindfulness among athletes to better manage stress and pressure in preparation for sport performance.2 Olympic athletes, in particular, do not receive second chances; therefore, the ability to self-regulate in a desired direction is a critical skill for this population.3

Some Background

Much of the early work in biofeedback was limited to the medical field.4 However, quite a significant amount of biofeedback research was conducted in sport psychology during the 1980s and 1990s. Most studies found positive effects of biofeedback interventions on sport performance and stress management.5 Today, the biofeedback approach reflects a transactional view of sport performance.6 Specifically, sport performance (behavior) of athletes within a transactional system considers the environment (e.g., situation-athletes, coaches, professional support, family) and the interrelationships between the physiological, mental and emotional components of sport behavior.

Thus, information from a variety of sources must be assimilated to develop what is known as an "athlete profile."7 The sources of information come from the various sport medicine team members (e.g., sport medicine doctors, physiotherapists, nutritionists, physiologists, sport psychologists, equipment technicians, strength and conditioning coaches, high-performance directors), who are referred to as the Integrated Support Team (IST).

Generally, the IST will meet on a monthly basis to review each athlete and make recommendations to the coaches and high performance director. Consequently, the group profile is also important, such that if the group profile demonstrates a significant lack of stress management skills, performance under pressure may be compromised.

Biofeedback Assessment and Training

For Speedskating Canada, the biofeedback training program was conducted at the end of year one as part of a three-year comprehensive sport psychology program leading up to the 2010 Vancouver Olympic Games. Biofeedback assessment and training were introduced after other sport psychology interventions had been completed as part of an extensive program that included mental skills education with a cognitive behavioral approach, as well as mindfulness training through a mental skills log book completed daily by the athletes.

Several psychometric tests were also used to monitor and guide the direction of the interventions, such the Ottawa Mental Skills Assessment (OMSAT), Rest and Recovery Profile (RESTQ-S), Competitive State Anxiety Scale (CSAI-2), and the Test of Attentional and Interpersonal Style (TAIS). These data were gathered to develop individual athlete profiles and team profiles, which guided the IST and coaches in intervention decision making. In addition, this information served as feedback for athletes, which guided their individual mental performance consultations.

The biofeedback stress assessment consisted of both a psychophysiological and EEG test to evaluate individual responses to stress under 14 conditions (e.g., a stroop test). The following parameters were measured using software: heart rate and heart rate variability (HRV), respiration rate (RR), muscle activity using EMG, skin temperature (ST), skin conductance (SC), and brain wave activity frequency using EEG.

Training sessions were conducted each week both in the physiology and the EEG program. A competency-based approach prevailed until each athlete developed automaticity with each skill area (HRV, EMG, SC, ST, and alpha EEG training).The physiological component of the biofeedback training program involved teaching HRV to the athletes by using a 5 to 6 count to anchor their diaphragmatic breathing. Individualizing the program meant that athletes could continue in each training module until they developed the competency required before moving forward in the program. A stress test device was used for home education for those that required extra training. On average, six to 10 sessions per athlete were conducted in this phase.

The psycho-physiological training program consisted of teaching athletes alpha training such that they could relax mentally by reducing negative self-talk (Beta 2-3) and simultaneously rewarding Beta 1 and alpha, in both eyes-open and eyes-closed conditions. Once in this state, athletes were asked how they got into this state, and to give it a term to which they could return to in their next training session (i.e., centering, quiet mind). Sport-specific visualizations were also added in this alpha state to enhance confidence.

Finally, athletes were asked to use these skills in training through use of their daily log book, to consolidate them within simulated competitions. The next phase was to apply these skills in the World Cup competition. Self-monitoring and evaluation completed the process, which ended the skill acquisition stage of year two.

Biofeedback Reaction-Time Program

In addition to the core biofeedback intervention, reaction-time biofeedback was utilized off-ice to more effectively prepare 500-meter sprinters with their pre-start routines. This training closely followed the learning of competencies in biofeedback and EEG training. Consequently, the scope and sequence of the reaction-time program was integrated seamlessly with the biofeedback training program.

The aim of the reaction-time intervention was to better prepare athletes for the 500m sprint events at the 2010 Vancouver Olympic Games. In short-track speedskating, having the quickest reaction time combined with a good start allows you the significant advantage of claiming the inside position on the first turn, thus forcing your competitors to skate wide or follow you around the 500m oval track.

Biofeedback reaction time in combination with an individualized pre-start routine, start technique and start confidence all play an important role toward speedskating sprint success.

The reaction time equipment was engineered to improve the athlete's alertness in terms of arousal regulation (activation), vigilance and expert signal sensitivity8-that is, the goal was to optimize the reaction time between hearing a gun/tone at the start of a race with the initiation of the first foot movement forward. Hundreds of starts could be trained this way in a training cycle without wasting much physical energy (under sub-maximal muscle tension).

Vancouver 2010 Olympic Games

The goal of this multifaceted sports psychology program, with biofeedback as an integral module, was to prepare each individual skater to perform their personal best performance under pressure and on demand at the Olympic Games. The Canadian Short-Track Speedskating Team achieved its goals, both from a sprint perspective and from a team perspective.

First, from a sprint perspective, the men's team brought home one gold and one bronze medal, while the women's team earned one silver medal and a fourth place in the 500m sprints. Finally, from a team perspective, the men's team won the team relay gold, while the women brought home the silver in the team relay for a total of five Olympic medals.

Future Implications

The role of sport psychology in a multidisciplinary context is increasingly recognized as an important component of the sports medicine team. Just as clinical athlete support is critical in dealing with injuries, the sport science support team also plays an integral role in guiding the athlete toward preparation and/or re-entry to the athletic playing field.

Multidisciplinary sports medicine centers that cater to a variety of athletes' needs will play an increasing role in guiding athletes toward injury prevention, sport-specific training and performance enhancement.

The future appears promising with the development of multifaceted sport medicine facilities that-in addition to clinical support-will incorporate psychological skills training and strategies for performance enhancement, which may include the utilization of biofeedback, reaction-time training, vision training, sport-specific decision training, virtual reality simulators and sport performance analytics...."





Aug. 31st, 2011

BIOFEEDBACK GSR w terapii ADHD



 


Prosty system GSR do autorelaksacji



Szanowni Państwo,

NEUROTERAPIA w modalności EEG stanowi dziś klasykę w terapii ADHD. Modlaność GSR w leczeniu i diagnostyce tego rodzaju zaburzeń u dzieci nie jest już standardem.
Poniżej pozwalam sobie zaprezentować poparty doświadczeniem pomysł na wykorzystanie BIOFEEDBACKU GSR w terapii i diagnozie ADHD, zaproponowany przez jednego z amerykańskich neuroterapeutów.

Z Szacunkiem

Dariusz Wyspiański



"GSR vs ADHD

Whereas the GSR was traditionally used to teach relaxation it was overlooked as a tool to teach relaxed concentration being dwarfed by the popular and successful neurofeedback.

Measuring electron flow in a circuit the body operates largely by a series of electrical impulses which have been shown to follow certain pathways and measure changes in the electrical resistance or the ability of the tissue to conduct electricity. The GSR activity marker is positive in the majority of ADD clients tested. Once tested, then the GSR biofeedback may be used to improve the stress result with different techniques. A protocol using this valid objective physiological marker has just been published in a video- "Guide for GSR Biofeedback Techniques for the Natural ADHD Practitioner" (Amazon.com).

Using the GSR protocol only takes 10 minutes to perform. The test is valid for children as well as adults and helps parents determine if their ADHD children need intervention. The measure may then be used to match a personal technique protocol to the client depending on what type of technique helps improve the GSR from lability to stability during rest.

The GSR is measured as labile and steadily increases in amplitude when the ADHD child tries to sit quietly for 2 minutes. The GSR is then increasingly more labile during an eyes closed condition. This is in contrast to the GSR in anxiety where there is usually a decrease during a relaxing eyes closed baseline condition. In some instances- the GSR in ADHD is stable - however, will not return to baseline after prompted with a mild stimulus like noise. This shows that a symptom of ADHD when trying to sit quietly and concentrate -is acting like a stress-or for him her. This is not unlike the "disorientation" experienced in dyslexics when trying to read.

Many ADHD clients- upon producing a stable GSR after a biofeedback assisted relaxed concentration technique - will claim when asked-that this is the first time ever they felt what relaxation /concentration is. This may be compared to someone not having ever tasted a tasty food like an orange. You can't describe it to them. However, once they taste it- they know what it feels like. So too, it turns out, with the sense of relaxation, focus in ADHD. When asked to compare this sensation with the sensation of an ADHD medication- the majority of ADHD people will say that the natural biofeedback induced sensation is better than medication- and medication does not "feel well" even though it does help them concentrate. This shows that medication like Ritalin has a different mode of action working to help ADHD than natural and behavioral methods.
The relaxation and relaxed concentration response is natural and seems to be lacking in many people with ADHD. These responses might have been lacking at birth or were compromised with an unbalancing childhood medical problem (Ears nose and throat, asthma,-sleep disorder-medical operation). However, once re-learned or acquired - the ADHD person can re-produce this
"sensation" upon need. Like learning art or music- some are born with it- but all can learn to be artists or musicians with the proper instruction. This objective physiological test is easy to replicate only with the most sensitive /graphic GSR biofeedback equipment(like Thought Stream or Mindlife for example). My hope is that this simple and valid measure will be used as a future screening test in ADHD clinics and schools as well as by biofeedback practitioners helping ADHD.

A bit of the history in how this method was developed. I began treating children with ADD quite unexpectedly in 1991. As a biofeedback practitioner and part of an anxiety clinic in Tel Aviv, Israel, I had absolutely no experience in treating children but was doing quite well with adults suffering from stress disorders and teenagers who had test anxiety and social phobias. The biofeedback clinic had just opened and each type of patient was a new experience.

With medical- technological training in neuro-electrodiagnostics and sleep/wake disorders, I was more into the neurological and psycho- physiological disorders. A child psychologist working with me wanted to try biofeedback on ADD. Then he had said that there was no treatment and no objective test for this poorly understood syndrome. The only remedy at the time was Ritalin although reports about EEG (electroencephalogram) neuro - biofeedback and Joel Lubar's research with Neurofeedback were just coming out (1991) demonstrating that ADHD can respond to a behavioral method. At first I found that EMG (testing muscle tension)was increased in ADHD and there was already a study showing that EMG biofeedback did not help in ADHD.

However, I found that found that GSR ( electrodermal resistance) was better and easier to use in ADHD than EMG. At the time there were no studies of GSR biofeedback for ADD- so I had to go it alone. After starting to treat a handful of children with biofeedback, the psychologist I was working with had to leave the unit and I had to suddenly take over..."



Jul. 20th, 2011

PSYCHOFIZJOLOGICZNY STAN OSIĄGANY W TOKU MEDYTACJI A REDUKCJA BÓLU


 

Szanowni Państwo,

Poniżej pozwalam sobie na przedstawienie artykułu odwołującego się do badań prowadzących w USA dot. pozytywnego wpływu MEDYTACJI na zjawisko odczuwania bólu, przez pacjentów przewlekle chorych. Dla mnie, jako Neuroterapeuty praktykującego aplikacje BIOFEEDBACKU, badania te tylko potwierdzają fakt, iż działania ukierunkowane na harmonizację procesów psychofizjologicznych, zorientowane na osiąganie stanu homeostazy organizmu przynoszą zbawienne rezultaty.
Artykuł pochodzi z "MyHealts Daily News", jego autorką jest Amanda Chan

Z Szacunkiem

Dariusz Wyspiański


"Brain Scans Show How Meditation Eases Pain

New Jersey resident Frank Nafey wakes up every day with discomfort in his back and right leg. On good days, all he has to deal with is stiffness. But on bad days, it feels as if a knife were lodged in his back.

Nafey, a 56-year-old retired teacher in Bedminster, was diagnosed 15 years ago with multiple sclerosis. The autoimmune disease attacked the neurons in his brain, limiting his ability to move and causing pain in his limbs.

But he practices yoga and meditation to soothe his pain, with breathing exercises to focus his mind on things other than his body. These practices alone don't take away the pain, but at least they help his mind "become distanced" from his body, he said.

"When you have a chronic disease, it oftentimes feels like you're trapped within the body," Nafey told MyHealthNewsDaily.

In a new study by researchers from Wake Forest University, brain scans illustrate the mechanisms behind Nafey's experiences. The brains of people who underwent meditation training and were subjected to five minutes of pain showed a decrease in activation in regions associated with pain.

And the participants reported lower levels of pain than before they learned how to meditate, the study said.

The study appears tomorrow (April 6) in the Journal of Neuroscience.

Looking at the brain scans

According to the researchers, 15 healthy volunteers were subjected to painful heat for five minutes from a device attached to their leg while they underwent arterial spin labeling magnetic resonance imaging, a type of brain scan that shows long durations of brain processes.

The scans revealed high activity in the primary somatosensory cortex, a brain region that determines the source and severity of pain.

Then the volunteers attended four 20-minute classes to learn a meditation technique called focused attention, which trained them to focus on breathing and to dismiss other thoughts or emotions.

After the meditation training, the study participants were again subjected to the painful heat on their leg while undergoing the brain scans. The scans revealed a decrease in activity in the primary somatosensory cortex and an increase in the activity in three regions that shape how the body experiences pain: the anterior cingulate cortex, anterior insula and the orbito-frontal cortex.

The ratings that the study participants assigned to the pain decreased 40 percent after they attended the meditation training sessions.

Acute pain and chronic pain

The findings show that meditation affects multiple regions in the brain to relieve pain sensations, said Alex Zautra, a psychology professor at Arizona State University who was not involved with the study.

Changes in breathing rate or heart function didn't account for the differences in pain ratings from before the meditation training to after it, so "changes in attention deployment made possible through training in mindfulness appear to have been the primary mechanism here," Zautra told MyHealthNewsDaily.

People at highest risk for acute pain, including firefighters, police officers and members of the military, stand to benefit the most from these studies, he said.

However, further study is needed before meditation is encouraged as a primary solution for chronic pain, Zautra said.
Some people with chronic pain, like those who have fibromyalgia, may need additional treatment beyond meditation to soothe symptoms, he said.

Zautra authored a study, published last year in the journal Pain, that showed that breathing exercises could decrease pain sensations in healthy women. However, the results were mixed for women with fibromyalgia; only the women who had positive outlooks on life reported decreased pain sensations, his study showed.

Pass it on: Brain scans reveal that meditation can reduce sensations of pain....."



Jun. 19th, 2011

NEUROPLASTYCZNOŚĆ MÓZGU - psychofizjologiczny mechanizm zmian w psychoterapii




Szanowni Państwo,

Niedawno uczestnicząc w Konferencji dot. zagadnień współczesnej psychoterapii, uświadomiłem sobie iż :
Neuroplastyczność mózgu, zdolność do tworzenia korowych połączęń funkcjonalnych jest zjawiskiem obserwowanym w procesach psychoterapeutycznych opartych na zmianie zachowań - kształtowaniu nowych nawyków gwarantujących trwałośc procesu zmiany terapeutycznej.
Można więc pokusić się o twierdzenie tożsamosci psychofizjologicznych podstaw skutecznej psychoterapii i terapii Biofeedback.
W mojej pracy (w ramach autorskiej metody udzielania wsparcia psychologicznego -"MENTORINGU TERAPEUTYCZNEGO" - szczegóły : http://neuropsychoterapia.beepworld.pl/) są to komplementarne środki oddziaływań prowadzace do jednego celu.....

Z Szacunkiem

Dariusz Wyspiański


May. 5th, 2011

BIOFEEDBACK - terapia redukcji lęku i napięcia


 
 EMG Biofeedback equipment


Szanowni Państwo,

Pozwalam sobie na zacytowanie fragmentu opracowania jakie ukazało się na amerykańskim wortalu AltMED, dotyczącym zagadnień aplikacji różnych modalnosci BIOFEEDACKU w oddziaływaniach terapeutycznych ukierunkowanych na redukcję napięć i stanów lękowych.

Z Szacunkiem

Dariusz Wyspiański



"Control Anxiety with Biofeedback

Biofeedback is a clinically-proven therapy that uses biofeedback equipment to monitor and display your physiological activity to expand your awareness and increase control of your body. Personal biofeedback training is an effective treatment for anxiety disorders that produces results comparable to those achieved by relaxation procedures like meditation and Progressive Relaxation.

Which are the major anxiety disorders?
All anxiety disorders share the symptoms of persistent irrational fear and uncertainty. The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV) of the American Psychiatric Association lists the following anxiety disorders:

panic disorder
the phobias
generalized anxiety disorder
obsessive-compulsive disorder
posttraumatic stress disorder
adjustment disorder with anxious features

Generalized anxiety disorder is one of the most common anxiety disorders. These patients exhibit symptoms that include:

anxiety
worry
restlessness
fatigue
concentration
muscle tension
sleep disturbance

Who is mainly affected?

Americans suffer from anxiety disorders more than any other psychological disorder. The National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) estimates that 18 million Americans age 18 or older experience an anxiety disorder each year. Anxiety disorders interfere with job performance and social relationships. The high incidence of unhealthy behaviors like physical inactivity, alcohol abuse, smoking, and substance abuse may contribute to high rates of medical and psychiatric disorders.

Women have twice the rate of anxiety disorder as men. Anxiety disorders are more frequent among individuals 25-44 years of age who are separated or divorced and who have low socioeconomic status. Although the anxiety disorders have devastating effects on these patients’ lives, only 15 to 36 percent receive treatment.

How do biofeedback professionals assess anxiety disorder patients?

After a medical evaluation to rule out medical diseases and medications that can produce the symptoms of anxiety, a biofeedback practitioner may conduct a psychophysiological profile that monitors your breathing, EEG, finger temperature, heart rhythm, skeletal muscle activity, and skin conductance during resting, mild stressor, and recovery conditions using biofeedback electrodes. The psychophysiological profile will enable your biofeedback provider to develop an individualized training program to correct abnormal physiological changes associated with anxiety episodes.

Frequent findings during biofeedback stress tests of patients with anxiety disorders include:

shallow, rapid breathing
imbalances between fast-wave (beta rhythm) and slow-wave (alpha and theta rhythm) activity in the EEG
constriction of the small arteries of the fingers
reduced heart rate variability
contraction of muscles in the upper shoulders, neck, and forehead
increased sweat gland activity

What is biofeedback therapy?
Biofeedback techniques use biofeedback instruments to increase your awareness and control of your physiological performance. A clinician’s biofeedback instructions are guided by the information provided by the biofeedback devices suggested by the psychophysiological profile.

How does biofeedback treat anxiety disorders?
Biofeedback training methods may combine cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), which is a form of psychotherapy, with one or more kinds of biofeedback training, including:

EEG biofeedback (brain electrical activity)
EMG biofeedback (skeletal muscle activity)
heart rate variability biofeedback (timing between heartbeats)
respiratory biofeedback (breathing patterns)
skin conductance biofeedback (sweat gland activity)
temperature biofeedback (blood flow through small arteries)
What is your role in biofeedback training?
Biofeedback professionals assign “homework” during each training session. You are expected to chart symptoms and practice self-regulation skills in between training sessions.

These assignments often involve:

lifestyle modification, in which you change routine behaviors like diet and exercise
biofeedback practice, in which you practice self-regulation using portable biofeedback devices that range in sophistication from a disposable thermometer to a compact heart rate variability trainer
relaxation exercises, which may involve practice in reducing arousal that takes from 15 seconds to 30 minutes
self-monitoring, in which you record your symptoms, performance, or daily experience
Why is “homework” important to your success?
These assignments help you to expand your awareness and control to the diverse settings and activities of your daily life. Practice allows you to transfer your new skills from the clinic to everyday life where you need them. Studies confirm that successful biofeedback patients practice at least occasionally.

There are many reasons why regular practice contributes to success:

Practice devotes more time on task. When you practice five times a week for 30 minutes, you have added 6 ½ hours to the 1-2 hours you spend in the biofeedback clinic.
Practice extends training to new settings and activities. Just because you can warm your hands in the clinic does not mean that you can warm them at home or at the office. You may need to practice in each setting to transfer your self-control skill to that setting.
Practice allows you to consciously correct unhealthy behaviors like shallow, rapid breathing or muscle bracing.
Practice makes self-control automatic. You may need to practice a relaxation skill like skeletal muscle relaxation for 6 months until you can perform it automatically at the first sign of trouble.
How effective is biofeedback for anxiety?
Most controlled, randomized biofeedback clinical trials have found that biofeedback reduces anxiety as much as popular relaxation procedures like meditation. They both may achieve comparable results because they correct core problems in attention, cognition, and physiological arousal. Stress management biofeedback may help patients control the events that trigger anxiety attacks..."



Mar. 16th, 2011

Czym jest HEG BIOFEEDBACK - aplikacje terapeutyczne, korzyści


 

Szanowni Państwo,

Modalność HEG w zastosowaniu neuroterapii zdobywa coraz więcej zwolenników i zaczyna stanowić coraz wyraźniejszą alternatywę dla EEG BIOFEEDBACKU znacznie trudniejszego w praktycznej aplikacji.
Poniżej pozwalam sobie na zacytowanie opisu funkcjonalności HEG BIOFEEDBACKU pochodzącego ze strony http://trening-uwagi.pl/nowastrona/heg-biofeedback/, stanowiącej wizytówkę jednego z prywatnych gabinetów wykorzystujących HEG BIOFEEDBACK w pracy neuroterapeutycznej (PRACOWNIA BIOFEEDBACK - Warszawa).
Na uwagę zasługuje czytelność i prostota tekstu połączona z trafnością opisu metody, pomimo niewątpliwie reklamowaego charakteru wypowiedzi.

Z Szacunkiem

Dariusz Wyspiański



"Na czym polega HEG Biofeedback?

Zasadę działania HEG Biofeedback – w uproszczeniu – można przedstawić następująco:

1. Wykonywanie zadań umysłowych aktywuje neurony w odpowiednich obszarach mózgu.
2. Neurony, aby wykonać swoją pracę potrzebują odpowiednią ilość energii.
3. Dostarczenie odpowiedniej ilości energii wiąże się ze zwiększonym przepływem krwi i jej utlenienia
4. Utlenienie krwi może być mierzone za pomocą specjalnego „termometru” – spektrometru.
5. Trenujący widzi na ekranie poziom utlenienia płatów czołowych i może go – wykorzystując mechanizm sprzężenia zwrotnego – świadomie kontrolować.

Trenuj Twój Executive Brain
Trening HEG biofeedback polega na pobudzaniu neuronów w frontalnych płatach mózgu. Korzyści płynące z aktywacji czołowej okolicy kory mózgowej są ogromne. Ten obszar mózgu nazywany jest „Executive Brain”. Z przodu znajdują się bowiem struktury „zarządcze”, czyli odpowiedzialne za:

* koncentrację, skupienie uwagi na jednym zadaniu,
* pamięć roboczą,
* „zdawanie sobie sprawy”
* planowanie i organizację działań,
* wolę działania, automotywację,
* ocenę sytuacji i podejmowanie decyzji
* odpowiedzialność za własne działania, zamiast obwiniania innych lub warunków zewnętrznych za swoje niepowodzenia
* zdolność do odroczonej gratyfikacji,
* elastyczność w dostosowaniu do nowych sytuacji
* kontrolę impulsywności, kontrolę stanów emocjonalnych
* przewidywanie konsekwencji działań
* konformizm społeczny, takt, wyczucie sytuacji
* ekspresję językową
* kojarzenie sytuacyjne

Jeżeli chcesz poprawić Executive Brain – aktywizuj płaty czołowe kory mózgowej

Czego można się spodziewać po treningu HEG?
Efekty treningu HEG Biofeedback zaskoczą Ciebie. Po kilkunastu sesjach:

* zaczniesz z ciekawością podchodzić do spraw, które do tej pory wydawały Ci się nudne
* staniesz się bardziej zadowolony ze swojego życia,
* będziesz bardziej decyzyjny, zwiększysz kontrolę nad własnym życiem
* inaczej spojrzysz na dotychczasowe problemy, trudności
* staniesz się bardziej otwarty i wrażliwy na potrzeby i pragnienia innych ludzi
* sytuacje stresujące będziesz znosić spokojniej, staniesz się bardziej opanowany.

HEG Biofeedback jest szczególnie polecany dzieciom z ADHD. Obniżony przepływ krwi w obszarach czołowych jest jednym z ważniejszych markerów ADHD. Ponadto, trening HEG – w przeciwieństwie do EEG – nie wymaga od trenującego nieruchomego siedzenia w trakcie 2-3 minutowej sesji..."

Żródło: "Pracownia Biofeedback-Warszawa"




BIOFEEDBACK jako narzędzie wspierające terapię traumy związanej z molestowaniem seksualnym



 
Przenośny zestaw do Biofeedbacku w modalności GSR



Szanowni Państwo,

Seattle Institute of Sex Therapy, Education and Research” (USA) zaprezentował wyniki badań dot. zastosowania „BIOFEEDBACKU”  (modalności GSR i EMG) jako wsparcia metod terapeutycznych w pracy z osobami o traumatycznych doświadczeniach związanych z molestowaniem seksualnym.
W mojej ocenie są to ciekawe informacje wskazujące na kolejny obszar wykorzystania „BIOFEEDBACKU” jako wsparcia szeroko pojmowanych procesów terapeutycznych.


Z Szacunkiem

Dariusz Wyspiański


"Seattle Institute for Sex Therapy, Education, and Research

Biofeedback as a Tool to Aid Recovery from Trauma

Survivors of any kind of sexual trauma — be it rape, incest, or any other kind of non-consenting or exploitative sexual activity — very often are left not only with psychological scarring, but also psychophysiological damage. Inability to sleep at night, excessive drinking, and binge eating are all quite common. What this all adds up to is stress. We all live with stress to one degree or another: the twentieth century has been called The Age of Anxiety. All stress is not harmful. As a source of motivation, stress can spur us on to creative work and it can enrich our pleasurable activities. However, stress resulting from sexual trauma is never beneficial, and often requires professional treatment to aid in recovery. The development of practical relaxation skills emphasizing strengthening an internal locus of control can be facilitated by biofeedback. This article will discuss how biofeedback can be used to integrate relaxation training with increased internal control of physiologic responses, and how this, in conjunction with sex therapy, can help clients recover from sexual trauma.
PITFALLS OF TRADITIONAL RELAXATION TRAINING
When working out treatment plans, it is helpful to give the client some sort of stress management training, either by loaning them tapes on progressive relaxation or by some kind of in-office instruction on relaxation. It is often assumed that the client having listened to the tapes, or having gone through a few sessions in the office, is thus able to have increased means of coping with her/his stress. This is often not the case: even if the client has followed the instructions carefully, and now appears relaxed, she/he may still be unable to relax to any appreciable degree, especially when confronted with daily stressors. Why is this? I believe it is because not enough time is dedicated to teaching the client the subtleties of relaxing under varied circumstances. This may include confronting denied emotions, and detecting and managing early signs of anxiety-producing thoughts. How can the therapist teach and know that the client is learning the necessary skills? The answer to this question is, I believe, biofeedback.
BIOFEEDBACK ASSISTED RELAXATION
At Seattle Institute for Sex Therapy, Education, and Research, we use biofeedback to assist our clients in a number of ways. One method is skill training using biofeedback-assisted relaxation protocols. The goal here is to learn to detect, identify, and experience physiological status and change this status toward relaxation. Once this is accomplished we go on to teach our clients generalization training so that they develop accurate self-perception in the absence of instrument-assisted feedback. The ultimate goal is to take generalization self-regulatory skills from practice in the therapist's office (or at home) to real-life environments where instrument-assisted feedback is not possible. This requires self confidence in self-physiological perception and in self-regulatory physiological change.
BIOFEEDBACK ASSISTED TRANSACTIONAL PSYCHOPHYSIOLOGY
Another exciting application for biofeedback is its use in transactional psychophysiology. This allows the therapist to monitor subtle subconscious arousal responses while interacting with the client. One of its uses is eliciting abreactions and confronting denied emotions. This application of biofeedback allows significant improvement in the shortest treatment time. Clients who have been in therapy for a year or more, blocked with denied emotions, are often able with the skills of relaxation and the use of biofeedback-assisted transactional psychophysiology to identify and get beyond previous stumbling blocks.
SPECIFIC MODALITIES OF BIOFEEDBACK
There are many modalities available to the therapist interested in biofeedback-assisted treatment. We use the following three modalities:
1. Electrodermograph (EDR)
2. Temperature
3. Electromyograph (EMG)
The two most useful modalities are Temperature and EDR. We use EMG mostly for treating muscle tension-related problems such as tension headaches.
Traditionally EDR has been called Galvanic Skin Response (GSR). The skin conductance measure has two primary characteristics. First, the slower changing tonic levels are thought to be an index of the general level of arousal in the sympathetic nervous system: the higher the skin conductance levels, the higher the level of arousal. The second, shorter, and more abrupt phasic response are thought to be associated with short-term stimuli such as thoughts or external events. At our clinic sessions we display to the client the ongoing and instantaneous activity of skin conductance. This feedback informs the therapist and the client of the activity patterns of her/his nervous system. This enables the client to become aware of nervous system activity normally outside the domain of sensory awareness. When used within a learning framework, the feedback reinforces and provides discriminative cues for the control or self-regulation of either general levels of arousal or emotional responsivity to specific thoughts or events. When we use the feedback in a desensitization framework, it provides the therapist and client with an index of the level of arousal to a specific item in the hierarchy, and can be used to guide the desensitization process...."
The temperature (thermal) module is used to provide an indirect measurement of peripheral cardiovascular activity, and, in turn, sympathetic nervous system arousal. The vessels (arterioles) which supply blood to the periphery are surrounded by smooth muscles which are innervated by the sympathetic branch of the autonomic nervous system. With sympathetic arousal or activation, the muscles in the vascular beds constrict (vaso-constriction) resulting in a reduction in peripheral blood flow and ultimately a reduction in tissue temperature. With decreased sympathetic activity, the muscles in the vascular beds relax (vasodilation) resulting in an increase in peripheral blood flow and ultimately an increase in tissue temperature. We monitor general levels of stress with this modality, thus allowing us to compare the data with normative data within and across sessions.
UNIFIED BIOFEEDBACK APPROACH IN SEX THERAPY
A fundamental shortcoming of most relaxation training is that the skills training focuses on the relaxation end of the relaxation/stress continuum. The implication is that teaching stress reduction techniques reduces the individual's experience of stress and aids in adjustment. It is my experience that the stressors specific to each client — conscious or subconscious — must be exposed and explored before control of either can be accomplished. .."




Mar. 9th, 2011

WARSZTAT :"Wprowadzenie do ogólnego biofeedbacku"



 

Szanowni Państwo,

Poniżej pozwalam sobie na przedstawienie informacji otrzymanej od Pana Dr Rafała Sztembisa

Z Szacunkiem

Dariusz Wyspiański


Informujemy, że w dniach 28.03.2011. - 01.04.2011. odbędzie się warsztat

'Wprowadzenie do ogólnego biofeedbacku'

z omówieniem wszytskich modalności i ich praktycznym zastosowaniem w medycynie, psychologii i innych dziedzinach oraz II edycja Podkarpackich Spotkań Psychologia-Medycyna-Zdrowie.

Rzeszów, Hotel Nowy Dwór

Elementem materiałów dodatkowych będzie książka przygotowana przez wykładowców - Donalda Mossa i Frederica Shaffera - specjalnie z okazji przyjazdu do Polski.

Warsztat pod patronatem Wydziału Medycyny Umysłu i Ciała Saybrook Graduate University.

Osoby prowadzące: Donald Moss i Frederic Shaffer.

Plan szczegółowy warsztatów

Dzień 1
Modalności: EMG, HRV, RESP, SC i TEMP
Zaburzenia: Hiperwentylacja, Ból, Stres; Wprowadzenie – Czym jest biofeedback? 1 godz. Biofeedback: Historia 1 godz.

Modele praktyki biofeedback – radzenie sobie ze stresem, stereotypy reakcji na stres, proces przerwanych emozji, oddychanie, przekonania, duchowość 2 godz; Stres, relaksacja, opanowanie umysłu 1 godz Jak funkcjonują urzadzenia do biofeedbacku 2 godz

Dzień 2
Modalności: EMG i TEMP
Zaburzenia: nadciśnienie tętnicze pierwotne, dolegliwości bólowe odcinka lędźwiowo-krzyżowego, migrena, zespół Raynaud, udar, napięciowe bóle głowy oraz TMJD (bruksyzm I zaburzenia stawu skroniowo-żuchwowego)
Jak działaja urządzenia do biofeedbacku 1 godz EMG biofeedback 3 godz Temp biofeedback 3 godz

Dzień 3
Modalności: BVP, kapnometria, EKG, HRV i RESP
Zaburzenia: zaburzenia lękowe, astma, choroba wieńcowa, depresja, nadciśnienie tętnicze, niespecyficzne dolegliwości bólowe brzucha Biofeedback przewodnictwa elektrycznego skóry 2 godz HRV biofeedback 3 godz Biofeedback oddechu 2 godz

Dzień 4
Modalności: AVS, EEG, fMRI, HEG, heart rate watch, incentive inspirometer, QEEG, temperatura Zaburzenia: uzaleznienie, ADHD, autyzm, depresja, padaczka, migrena, zespół stresu pourazowego oraz urazy głowy EEG biofeedback--AVS i HEG 5 godzin


Konferencja ½ dnia


 

Dzień 5
Modalnosci: BVP, kapnometria., EKG, HRV i RESP

Profil psychofizjologiczny 1 godz
Jak zaplanować sesję 1 godz
Jak zaplanowac ćwiczenia do domu 1 godz

Ograniczenia biofeedbacku 1 godz tanie techniki biofeedback 1 godz

CERTYFIKACJA:

Sam warsztat, zaplanowany na 5 dni, zostanie poprowadzony wg zaleceń Biofeedback Certification International Alliance oraz American Association of Psychophysiology and Biofeedback. Ponadto warsztatowi patronuje Saybrook Graduate University (dla studentów możliwość uzyskania punktów edukacyjnych).


ZAKWATEROWANIE:
W cenę noclegu wliczone jest:  - podatek VAT- śniadanie w formie bufetu szwedzkiego serwowane w restauracji w godz. 7.00 – 11.00 - miejsce parkingowe - możliwość korzystania z basenu oraz jacuzzi w Hotelu Nowy Dwór w Świlczy - Internet przewodowy i bezprzewodowy - korzystanie z sejfu

 

Cena warsztatu 1300zł bez noclegu; cena obejmuje:

  • tłumaczenie, materiały informacyjne w tym podręcznik, wyżywienie, udziałem w konferencji (program poniżej) z uroczystą kolacją, udział w dodatkowych prezentacjach


    REJESTRACJA : tel 888-461-355, p. Karolina CZAJA

     

     





Feb. 21st, 2011

V. ZJAZD POLSKIEGO TOWARZYSTWA BIOFEEDBACKU I PSYCHOFIZJOLOGII STOSOWANEJ - KONFERENCJA




Szanowni Państwo,

Z ogromną przyjemnością spełniam prośbę Szanownej Pani Doktor Michaeli Pakszys i zamieszczam informację dot. V. ZJAZDU POLSKIEGO TOWARZYSTWA BIOFEEDBACKU I PSYCHOFIZJOLOGII STOSOWANEJ” oraz  specjalistycznego szkolenia „NEUROFEEDBACK i AVS w naprawie ADHD i spektra zaburzeń autystycznych /zespół Aspergera/”

Łączę wyrazy Szacunku

Dariusz Wyspiański



"Szanowny Panie Magistrze,
ze względu na liczne wizyty neuroterapeutów na Pana stronie
poświęconej zagadnieniom BFB, uprzejmie proszę o zamieszczenie na niej informacji (tak jak w latach poprzednich) o kursokonferencji i Zjeżdzie Towarzystwa.
Pozdrawiam serdecznie

dr n.med.Michaela Pakszys
Prezes Polskiego Towarzystwa Biofeedback
i Psychofizjologii Stosowanej
Warszawa



Szanowni Państwo

Zapraszamy serdecznie wszystkich PT. KOLEGÓW TERAPEUTÓW EEG BIOFEEDBACK na 2-dniowe spotkanie naukowo-szkoleniowe

w dniach 19-20.05.2011r. w godz.9-17.00 w Warszawie Powiślu,
w Sali Konferencyjnej ZNP, II. piętro budynku Związku Nauczycielstwa Polskiego , ul.Wybrzeże Kościuszkowskie 35, Warszawa , przystanek tramwaju lub autobusu „POWIŚLE”/.

PROGRAM SPOTKANIA PRZEWIDUJE:

1.kurs tematyczny w czwartek 19.05.2011 9-17g.

„NEUROFEEDBACK i AVS w naprawie ADHD i spektra zaburzeń autystycznych /zespół Aspergera/”.
Kierownik naukowy: dr n. med. M. Pakszys
W programie: a. nowości w diagnostyce i naprawie ADHD i autyzmu za pomocą neurofeedback i AVS
b.przykłady prawidłowych zachowań nauczycieli w sytuacjach kryzysowych zawiązanych z ADHD,
c.aplikacje AVS i innych funkcji biofeedbacku w treningu multimodalnym biofeedback

Uczestnicy otrzymają Zaświadczenia o przeszkoleniu w zakresie używania AVS
Uczestnicy spotkania mogą się zgłaszać do Programu "Patronat EEG INSTYTUTU nad ośrodkami krajowymi Biofeedback" - uwaga: ADRES lub NAZWISKO PAŃSTWA PLACÓWKI JEST POTRZEBNY DO SPISU WSZYSTKICH DYPLOMOWANYCH TERAPEUTÓW EEG BFB, BFB I AVS W POLSCE ( do certyfikacji).
Opłata konferencyjna: 300 PLN

oraz

2.konferencję w piątek 20.05.2011 g.9-17

„V. ZJAZD POLSKIEGO TOWARZYSTWA BIOFEEDBACKU I PSYCHOFIZJOLOGII STOSOWANEJ”

Głównym tematem Zjazdu są nowości w diagnostyce i terapii EEG Biofeedback oraz Standaryzacja w EEG Biofeedback i biofeedback 2011.

Zapraszamy PT.Terapeutów do spotkania, wymiany doświadczeń, pochwalenia się sukcesami, omówienia nowych sposobów terapii.
Zapraszamy wszystkie ośrodki EEGBFB i BFB w kraju do wzięcia udziału w krótkim wystąpieniu 5-10 minutowym i zaprezentowaniu swojej pracy, profilu trenowanych, zaprezentowania swojej szkoły, ośrodka, gabinetu. Zapraszamy do przygotowania referatów i zgłaszania wystąpienia dotyczących usprawnienia pracy, nowych pomysłów i cennych wskazówek do terapii EEG Biofeedback.
W sesji plenarnej:
Wykład inauguracyjny dr n. med. M. Pakszys na temat standaryzacji 2011
w terapii EEGBFB i BFB i udoskonalenia warsztatu neuroterapeuty
Wystąpienia PT Kolegów
Zatwierdzenie i przyjęcie do zastosowania we wszystkich gabinetach Standardów terapii EEGBFB a BFB 2011
Wolne wnioski
Wystawa nowych aparatów na rynku, sprzętu i akcesoriów w promocyjnych cenach (w holu)

Do zobaczenia w Warszawie w ZNP w maju.
Zarząd Główny PTBPS

Opłata: 300 PLN , dla członków Towarzystwa 150 PLN

ZAKWATEROWANIE: uczestnicy spotkania mają możliwość zamówienia zakwaterowania :
1.na miejscu, hotel LOGOS, zamówienie na tel. 22-625-51-85, 22-622-89-92, 22-622-55-62/
2.w pobliżu:

Hotel Garwolińska – ul. Garwolińska 8/10 tel.022-68-17-633
Hotel Wojskowy – ul Szaserów tel. 022-68-16-873
Hotel Ibis – ulica Ostrobramska, tel. 022-515-78-00

ZGŁOSZENIA PISEMNĄ FORMĄ FAKSEM LUB E-MAILEM
do 20.04.2011r. na nr faksu : 22 – 671 59 14
Informacja telefoniczna: 22-671-59-14 lub 513-100-198
E-mail: eeginstytut@eeginstytut.pl






Feb. 4th, 2011

ONI STOSUJĄ BIOFEEDBACK : Kamil Stoch / kadra narodowa polskich skoczków narciarskich


 
Kamil Stoch - dwukrotny (jak dotąd) triumfator zawodów Pucharu Świata

Szanowni Państwo,

Wczoraj TVP zaprezentowała mini-reportaż dot. przygotowań Kadry Narodowej polskich skoczków narciarskich. Z satysfakcją dostrzegłem migawki z treningu EEG BIOFEEDBACK Kamila Stocha, wschodzącej gwiazdy polskich skoków, nastepcy Adama Małysza (który również z pasją stosuje neuroterapię).
Przykład Kamila Stocha, przeżywającego niezwykłe "przyspieszenie" w rozwoju kariery sportowej moze stanowić interesujące źródło potwierdzające efektywność terapii EEG BIOFEEDBACKU, jako narzędzia wspierającego proces treningowy.

 Z Szacunkiem

Dariusz Wyspiański



Jan. 31st, 2011

HEMOENCEFALOGRAFIA nowa forma BIOFEEDBACKU

 

Szanowni Państwo,

Ponizej prezentuję fragment artykułu autorstwa p. Glyn Blackett z YORK BIOFEEDBACK CENTER. Artykuł w sposób przystępny przedstawia aspekty praktycznego zstosowania HEMOENCEFALOGRAFII oraz wyjaśnia kluczowe pojęcia teoretyczne 

Z Szacunkiem

Dariusz Wyspiański



"Hemoencephalography:
A New Form of Neurofeedback

Glyn Blackett
YORK biofeedback CENTRE

Introduction
Neurofeedback is a means of training brain
functioning, either to ameliorate symptoms of a
disorder or to improve performance.
The trainee is presented with some measure of
brain activity, and tries to influence the signal in a
desired direction. Figure 1 shows a graph
obtained during a neurofeedback training session.
What specifically to we mean by activity and how
do we measure it? In “traditional” neurofeedback
we monitor the brain’s electrical activity - called
the electroencephalograph.
Hemoencephalography (HEG) is a more recent
development which is based on a different way of
quantifying brain activity.

The Physiological Basis of HEG
One way to quantify brain activity is in terms of
metabolic activity or metabolic rate. In fact this
concept has widespread applicability in the field
of neuroimaging. Metabolism is a cellular process
in which “fuel” in the form of glucose or sugar is
“burned” to release energy for use by the cell.
The process consumes oxygen and creates carbon
dioxide. Metabolic rate is the rate at which energy
is used up.
When the brain is engaged in some mental task
such as mental arithmetic, we expect that those
regions of the brain directly involved in the task
will use energy at a faster rate than other regions.
The human brain is extremely metabolically
active. Although the brain makes up just 2% of
body weight, it accounts for 20% of the body’s
oxygen consumption and 25% of glucose
consumption.1 In order to meet this energy
demand, brain tissue has an extremely dense
network of blood vessels and capillaries.
How do we measure metabolic rate? We can
measure it indirectly, in a number of ways. Some
of these ways rely on a phenomenon known as
neurovascular coupling.

Neurovascular Coupling
Metabolic activity depends upon a supply of
glucose and oxygen, which arrive via the
bloodstream. Neurovascular coupling is a
mechanism for matching blood flow to metabolic
demand in the brain. This means that whenever
there is a localised increase in neural activity
(which happens when the brain engages in some
specific mental task) there is a rapid localised
increase in cerebral blood flow. A consequence of
this response is that the blood in the active region
becomes more oxygenated (i.e. the concentration
of oxygen increases).
The process is managed by cells called astrocytes
- these are a common type of glial cell or support
cell in the brain.

Brain Scanning
There are two broad classes of brain scanners -
those that reveal structure and those that look at
activity. Here we’re concerned with the latter.
These scanners indirectly measure metabolic
activity. Typically they’re used in research to try
to infer which regions of the brain are involved in
particular tasks.
PET2 & SPECT3 measure the relative rates at
which glucose (the brain’s fuel) is used up.
Glucose which has been tagged with radioactive
atoms is injected into the subject’s bloodstream.
The fate of this glucose is tracked by measuring
the radiation it emits. Relatively more of it is
delivered to the more active regions of the brain.
Functional MRI or fMRI4 detects the localised
increases in blood oxygenation mentioned above.
This increase in oxygenation level changes the
magnetic properties of the blood, and this change
can be detected when the brain is subjected to a
strong magnetic field.

HEG
Like fMRI, HEG also detects changes in brain
activation by detecting changes in blood
oxygenation.
Let’s summarise the process:
A mental task activates neurons in some
particular region of the brain.
These neurons consume relatively more
energy
This demand for energy is met by a localised
increase in blood flow.
The local oxygenation level of the blood
increases.
There are actually two forms of HEG, each form
having its own sensor. They measure different
aspects of the one process (metabolic activation),
and hence have a similar range of appication and
achieve similar results.

Near Infra-Red HEG
Near infra-red (NIR) HEG is historically the first
form. It was invented by Dr Hershel Toomim. He
adapted a method called Infra-red Spectroscopy.
His original contribution was to realise that the
signal he was measuring could be consciously
influenced and hence was useful in a context of
biofeedback training.
The NIR device shines a light source into the
head, most typically at the forehead (in part
because hair obstructs the signal). The light is a
mixture of red and infra-red wavelengths. A
proportion of this light is bounced back out by a
physical process called scattering. The device
then measures this scattered light.
This is possible because the scalp, skull and brain
matter (both grey and white) are relatively
translucent to light of this wavelength. Blood,
however, is not. Furthermore, the proportions of
the light absorbed and scattered by blood depend
on its level of oxygenation. This means that as the
local oxygenation level of blood increases in
response to neural activation, the signal from the
device changes. Thus the device can detect
changes in the brain’s activation level.
Dr Toomim found a very good correlation
between his device and fMRI, which also relies
upon changes in blood oxygenation.5
The device can’t give absolute measurements of
activity. The signal is affected by factors such as
skull thickness - so we can’t compare one person
to another. But it can detect changes happening
over a short time scale, which is all we need in
order to be able to train activation.
The current generation of NIR HEG sensor only
detects activity in the brain’s outer layer - the
cortex. It is possible that future developments
may allow training of structures much deeper in
the brain.

Passive Infra-Red HEG
Passive Infra-Red or PIR HEG is conceptually
much simpler. It was invented by Dr Jeffrey
Carmen, who adapted a technique called
thermoscopy. The sensor detects light (or
electromagnetic radiation) of a particular
wavelength - a small band within the infra-red
(IR) part of the spectrum. This IR radiation is
essentially heat being radiated by the brain. The
sources are firstly local metabolic activity (sugar
being burned for energy release) and secondly,
local blood flow. This heat is detected in other
forms of thermal imaging - in fact thermal
cameras have been used to assess the effects of
HEG training - see figure 2.
Comparison with EEG Neurofeedback
Compared to EEG neurofeedback HEG has these
advantages:
The signal is much simpler to interpret: it
either increases or decreases in magnitude
(corresponding to increases and decreases in
brain activation, respectively).
The signal is more stable (EEG measures tend
to fluctuate rapidly and seemingly quite
randomly)
The signal is much less subject to
contamination by artefact.
Dr Toomim claims that clinical benefits are
achieved more rapidly.

Training HEG
In HEG neurofeedback, the trainee tries to
increase the signal, which is equivalent to
activating the region of the brain under the
sensor. To achieve this (at least for the forehead
placement) the trainee looks for:
an intensely alert or awake state of mind
a firm intention or desire that the signal
increase, but at the same time
a relaxed, open, emotionally positive state -
not getting too hooked into getting results
because frustration tends to lead to
deactivation.
Applications of HEG Neurofeedback
HEG is still a new neurofeedback modality and
much work needs to be done in researching the
applications. Here I’ll consider three areas where

HEG is already proving itself:
ADD
Depression
Migraine
The Prefrontal Cortex
One thing that links these disorders is the
possibility of dysregulation of the Prefrontal
Cortex (PFC).
The PFC is the region of the cortex (outer layer of
brain) behind the forehead, and also above the
eyeballs (on the underside of the brain). The PFC
is a particularly important part of the brain, most
highly evolved in humans, and sometimes
described as the brain’s executive control centre7.
It plays a central role in purposive behaviour -
making decisions, formulating and carrying out
plans and intentions, and sticking to them in the
face of distracting stimuli. It coordinates the brain
resources needed to carry out these intentions,
and evaluates actions in terms of their success or
failure in meeting objectives.
For instance, suppose one day it is time for your
evening meal. You’ll formulate a plan for
meeting that need - you decide to cook a meal,
and then decide what to cook. The PFC is
responsible for formulating the steps needed to
meet this goal - e.g. first get the pans and utensils
out. The PFC accesses the knowledge you need -
for example your memory of where you keep
your pans. Suppose the phone rings while you’re
cooking - you decide to answer it, but hold your
intentions in mind so that you can come back to
cooking when you’re finished on the phone.
The PFC is also strongly linked to motivation and
emotion (these are of course connected). You can
keep to a long-term plan (e.g. gaining a degree)
by somehow holding in mind the good feelings
connected to achieving that goal.
The PFC has the ability to inhibit other structures
in the brain connected to emotions, enabling you
to for example override a fear of heights when
you need to climb a ladder.
Emotions are connected decision-making - it
seems that the PFC arrives at decisions by in
some way “imagining” the feelings that would
result from each option.8
The PFC is especially relevant to social emotions
because our ability to imagine what other people
are thinking and feeling depends upon the PFC.
Figure 2: Images taken with a thermal camera, before (left) and after (right) a single
session of HEG training. The subject has AD/HD. Note the increase in temperature
seen over the whole forehead. Images courtesy of Dr. Robert Coben.

ADD
The behaviours described in the preceding section
are just those that people with ADD find difficult
- in short their problems are distractibility,
impulsiveness, disorganisation, short attention
span and quite commonly emotional difficulties
too.
ADD is a real neurological disorder, and typically
results in dysregulation of the PFC. The root of
the problem may lie in other parts of the attention
system (which includes many areas in the brain) -
for example the dopamine pathway that acts
something like the PFC’s power supply. PFC
function seems to be relatively easily
dysregulated since it is at the top of the brain’s
organisational tree.
Brain scanning studies have shown difficient
activty in the PFC of ADD sufferers, and is
sometimes seen to deactivate further during tasks
requiring concentrated attention, for which you
would normally see an increase in PFC activity.
Though still a new form of therapy, HEG
neurofeedback is showing promising results for
ADD.

Depression
Depressed people typically suffer from
diminished energy and motivation and poor
focus. Some experience emotional flatness, others
strongly painful emotions. All these symptoms
can be linked to dysregulation in the PFC.
Training increased activity in the PFC can be a
good idea for depression, firstly because it’s often
under-active9, and secondly since it plays a role in
regulating other emotional centres in the brain.
As with ADD, the PFC dysregulation may be
contingent upon problems somewhere else in the
brain, but that need not undermine the potential
benefit of training PFC activation.

Migraine
Dr Jeffrey Carmen developed PIR HEG
specifically to treat migraine, with encouraging
results. He treated 100 migraineurs with PIR
HEG over a four-year period.10 Over 90% of
subjects who completed at least 6 sessions
reported significant improvement in migraines.
‘Significant improvement’ was the point at which
it became difficult to identify headaches as
migraines - i.e substantially reduced pain levels.
Typically both pain levels and frequency of
migraine improved. (24 people dropped out of
therapy before 6 sessions for various reasons
including financial.) 61% experienced significant
improvement after six sessions or less.
The underlying neuropathology of migraine
remains unknown. Dr Carmen’s theory for the
efficacy of PIR HEG is that training strengthens
the PFC’s inhibitory control over some part of the
brain stem thought to generate migraines..."


Jan. 4th, 2011

“Neurofeedback Gains Popularity and Lab Attention" - NEW YORK TIMES


 


Szanowni Państwo,


Pozwalam sobie zaprezentować artykuł autorstwa Katerine Ellison, pochodzący z październikowej edycji “NEW YORK TIMESA”.
Warto zwrócić uwagę na statystyczne dane ilustrujące skalę oddziaływań terapeutycznych jakie prowadzone są w gabinetach w USA.
Wg. statystyk prowadzonych przez International Society for Neurofeedback and Research, ponad 7500 terapeutów prowadzi terapie neurofeedbacku, z których w okresie ostatnich 10 lat skorzystało ponad 100.000 pacjentów.
Zachęcam do lektury całości artykułu.

Z Szacunkiem

Dariusz Wyspiański



“Neurofeedback Gains Popularity and Lab Attention
K.Ellison, “New York Times”


You sit in a chair, facing a computer screen, while a clinician sticks electrodes to your scalp with a viscous goop that takes days to wash out of your hair. Wires from the sensors connect to a computer programmed to respond to your brain’s activity. .
Try to relax and focus. If your brain behaves as desired, you’ll be encouraged with soothing sounds and visual treats, like images of exploding stars or a flowering field. If not, you’ll get silence, a darkening screen and wilting flora.
This is neurofeedback, a kind of biofeedback for the brain, which practitioners say can address a host of neurological ills — among them attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, autism, depression and anxiety — by allowing patients to alter their own brain waves through practice and repetition.
The procedure is controversial, expensive and time-consuming. An average course of treatment, with at least 30 sessions, can cost $3,000 or more, and few health insurers will pay for it. Still, it appears to be growing in popularity.
Cynthia Kerson, executive director of the International Society for Neurofeedback and Research, an advocacy group for practitioners, estimates that 7,500 mental health professionals in the United States now offer neurofeedback and that more than 100,000 Americans have tried it over the past decade.
The treatment is also gaining attention from mainstream researchers, including some former skeptics. The National Institute of Mental Health recently sponsored its first study of neurofeedback for A.D.H.D.: a randomized, controlled trial of 36 subjects.
The results are to be announced Oct. 26 at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. In an interview in the summer, the study’s director, Dr. L. Eugene Arnold, an emeritus professor of psychiatry at Ohio State, noted that there had been “quite a bit of improvement” in many of the children’s behavior, as reported by parents and teachers.
Dr. Arnold said that if the results bore out that neurofeedback was making the difference, he would seek financing for a broader study, with as many as 100 subjects.
John Kounios, a professor of psychology at Drexel University, published a small study in 2007 suggesting that the treatment speeded cognitive processing in elderly people. “There’s no question that neurofeedback works, that people can change brain activity,” he said. “The big questions we still haven’t answered are precisely how it works and how it can be harnessed to treat disorders.”
Russell A. Barkley, a professor of psychiatry at the Medical University of South Carolina and a leading authority on attention problems, has long dismissed claims that neurofeedback can help. But Dr. Barkley says he was persuaded to take another look after Dutch scientists published an analysis of recent international studies finding significant reductions in impulsiveness and inattention.
Still, Dr. Barkley cautioned that he had yet to see credible evidence confirming claims that such benefits can be long lasting, much less permanent.
And another mainstream expert is much more disapproving. William E. Pelham Jr., director of the Center for Children and Families at Florida International University, called neurofeedback “crackpot charlatanism.” He warned that exaggerated claims for it might lead parents to favor it over proven options like behavioral therapy and medication.
Neurofeedback was developed in the 1960s and ’70s, with American researchers leading the way. In 1968, M. Barry Sterman, a neuroscientist at the University of California, Los Angeles, reported that the training helped cats resist epileptic seizures. Dr. Sterman and others later claimed to have achieved similar benefits with humans.
The findings prompted a boomlet of interest in which clinicians of varying degrees of respectability jumped into the field, making many unsupported claims about seeming miracle cures and tainting the treatment’s reputation among academic experts. Meanwhile, researchers in Germany and the Netherlands continued to explore neurofeedback’s potential benefits.
A major attraction of the technique is the hope that it can help patients avoid drugs, which often have side effects. Instead, patients practice routines that seem more like exercising a muscle.
Brain cells communicate with one another, in part, through a constant storm of electrical impulses. Their patterns show up on an electroencephalogram, or EEG, as brain waves with different frequencies.
Neurofeedback practitioners say people have problems when their brain wave frequencies aren’t suited for the task at hand, or when parts of the brain aren’t communicating adequately with other parts. These issues, they say, can be represented on a “brain map,” the initial EEG readings that serve as a guide for treatment. Subsequently, a clinician will help a patient learn to slow down or speed up those brain waves, through a process known as operant conditioning. The brain begins by generating fairly random patterns, while the computer software responds with encouragement whenever the activity meets the target.
Dr. Norman Doidge, a psychiatrist at the Center for Psychoanalytic Training and Research at Columbia and the author of “The Brain That Changes Itself” (Viking, 2007), said he considered neurofeedback “a powerful stabilizer of the brain.” Practitioners make even more enthusiastic claims. Robert Coben, a neuropsychologist in Massapequa Park, N.Y., said he had treated more than 1,000 autistic children over the past seven years and had conducted a clinical study, finding striking reductions in symptoms, as reported by parents.
Maureen and Terrence Magagnos of Lynbrook, N.Y., took their 7-year-old son, Peter, to Dr. Coben after he was given a diagnosis of pervasive developmental disorder in first grade. “He had classic symptoms of autism,” said Mr. Magagnos. “His speech was terrible, he made very little eye contact and he screamed for attention — literally screamed.”
Their exceptionally generous insurance covered neurofeedback, so they decided to give it a try, with sessions twice a week for the next five years.
At the start of the treatment, Dr. Coben said, he discovered that Peter had been suffering tiny, asymptomatic seizures. He says neurofeedback helped stabilize the child’s brain activity, eliminating the seizures. And within three months, said Mr. Magagnos, a retired police officer, Peter’s teachers were calling to report remarkable improvements.
“Today I’d say he has ‘autism light,’ ” he added. “He still has some symptoms, but he is much more manageable.”
Whether such results can be achieved with other children is a matter of debate. Still, as practitioners lobby for broader acceptance, including insurance recognition, a sure sign of neurofeedback’s increasing popularity is the number of companies selling supposedly mind-altering systems to use at home.
With names like SmartBrain Technologies and Drug Administration regulates all biofeedback equipment as medical devices. The only approved use, however, is for “relaxation.”
Peter Freer, a former grade-school teacher who is chief executive of a North Carolina firm called Unique Logic and Technology, says that since he began his business in 1994, he has sold several thousand of his “Play Attention” systems, advertised to improve a child’s focus, behavior, academic performance and social behavior.
The equipment, which costs $1,800, is advertised as “a sophisticated advancement of neurofeedback.” Mr. Freer says his clients include more than 600 school districts. (He adds that his system, as distinct from “clinical” neurofeedback, aims not to change brain waves but rather to put the user in an “attentive state” that makes it easier to learn skills.) Neurofeedback in general is a largely unregulated, with practitioners often devising their own protocols about where on the scalp to place electrodes. Results vary widely, and researchers caution that it is extremely important to choose one’s practitioner with care.
When it comes to to the actual devices, Dr. Kerson, at the International Society for Neurofeedback and Research, cautioned that they should never be used without experienced supervision.
“Oftentimes what people do is find a way to get one of these machines on eBay and use it at home,” she said, adding that unskilled use could interfere with medications or prompt an anxiety attack or a seizure.
“Neurofeedback is a powerful therapy,” she said, “and should be treated that way.”…”


Dec. 22nd, 2010

HEG BIOFEEDBACK - PEAK PERFORMANCE IMPROVEMENT



Szanowni Państwo,

Niniejszym pozwalam sobie na zacytowanie fragmentu artykułu Nowozelandzkiej Neuroterapeutki May Scott, dotyczący aplikacji HEMOENCEFALOGRAFII w terapii poprawiającej parametry intelektualnego funkcjonowania pacjenta. Autorka powołuje sie na badania potwierdzające analogiczny wpływ HEG BIOFEEDBACKU na "Peak Performance", w porównaniu do zastowoania oddziaływań terapeutycznych EEG BIOFEEDBACKU.

Z Szacunkiem

Dariusz Wyspiański



HEG BIOFEEDBACK - Peak Performance
May Scott (2010)

Peak Performance requires a balance of body and mind.
To achieve the above we offer a unique program to bring balance to your life and increase your potential to reach your Personal Best.



"A simple head band is used within which there are sensors and an infra-red light. It is easy to administer and comfortable to wear.

HEG (hemoencephalography) is the study of blood flow in the brain. More specifically, it is the study of voluntarily controlled blood flow or oxygenation in specifically chosen brain modules.

Brain activation is an exercise. Fresh blood brings in the necessary nutrition, oxygen and the glucose, that supplies the energy for a brain module to efficiently do its assigned job. Exercise affects the brain much like it affects muscles. New capillaries are formed to feed neurons. New connections between neurons are formed to carry information. Like a muscle, with exercise, the brain builds a vascular system, enabling more brain tissue for use by this brain area. The brain grows physically. With exercise, the brain builds a vascular system, enabling more brain efficiency in its use. Exercise is the road to a healthy brain!

HEG is very resistant to movement artifact and does not respond to eye movements at all. This feature makes pre-frontal cortex exercise simple and practical. Voluntary control of blood flow in the pre-frontal area is quickly learned, seldom requiring as much as 5 minutes and most often happening in less than one minute. The results are quantifiable as growth in vascularity between exercise sessions.

As a dynamic system, the brain may be continually degenerating and regenerating to maintain equilibrium at its current volume. Intentional brain activity can then raise the current level to a more useful condition and the “Use it or lose it” (Diamond et al., 1975) metaphor may be applicable.

HEG provides a simple way to increase neural demand for energy to fuel the basic angiogenic process that supports brain plasticity. “Neural progenitor cells proliferate in response to growth factors that are associated with angiogenesis…” (Palmer, Wilhoite, & Gage, 2000) and it is certainly possible that the increased blood flow after HEG training may be the result of angiogenesis.

It has been found to have a more rapid response to some challenges than that of other systems and has scientific research to give the comparison between HEG and EEG. It is a matter of choice and trial – both by the trainee and the trainer to establish which is preferable and more effecitive for that client...."


Dec. 14th, 2010

IMPROVE MENTAL HEALTH WITH NEUROFEEDBACK/Neurofeedback drogą do poprawy kondycji psychicznej


 

Szanowni Państwo,

Pozwalam sobie zacytować fragment artykułu autorstwa prof. Blaine Gretemana (Oklahoma State University) , pochodzącego z magazynu "SCIENCE" (marzec, 2009).
Artykuł stanowi przykład świetnie napisanej, rzetelnej merytorycznie naukowej publicystyki.

Z Szacunkiem

Dariusz Wyspiański


Improve mental health with neurofeedback

How you can train your brain to help reduce stress, enhance creativity and improve mental health.

Blaine Greteman | March 2009 issue

"As Vicki Wyatt attaches electrodes to my scalp with a generous glop of slimy goo, I'll admit I'm a little skeptical about the calming effects of the treatment I'm about to experience. With newborn twins at home, I usually have enough slime in my life and on my clothes to push anyone over the abyss. But that, says Wyatt, is precisely why I could benefit from neurofeedback, a therapeutic tool that advocates claim can reshape our brains—and our lives.
To learn more about the procedure, I've come to The Wyatt Clinic in downtown Oklahoma City. Just blocks from the memorial that marks the site of the 1995 federal building bombing, the location is aptly associated, in my mind, with both psychic trauma and healing. This is a gentrifying but hardscrabble neighborhood where Wyatt treats patients, from overstressed professionals to addicts trying to get back on their feet. Wyatt has been a therapist for 22 years, with a research background at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, but she has only recently embraced neurofeedback as part of her treatment regimen. "My formal education didn't really provide any alternative treatments," she says. "It was traditional psychotherapy and talk therapy. When I look back, I think this would have benefited a lot of the children and families earlier in my career."
The equipment looks fairly unexceptional, including the electrodes, which could pass for iPod headphones and are glued strategically to my head and temples. Wyatt clips a "ground wire" to my ear. The wires run from the electrodes to a black amplifier box the size of a small paperback. This deceptively simple-looking piece of machinery, which can cost several thousand dollars, processes electrical signals from my brain and sends them to a laptop, where they're represented graphically on the screen. Wyatt boots the laptop, opens a neurofeedback training software program and settles me into one of the comfy chairs that make her cozy, carpeted office look more like my mother's living room than the white-tiled clinic I'd expected.
After Wyatt hooks me up, I'll use my brain waves to control a video game. When I achieve the desired mental state, a small red bug will move around the screen eating flowers and emitting a happy chirping sound. To succeed at the game, I must eliminate brain waves that interfere with relaxed concentration—those associated with hyperactivity, depression and that all-too-familiar feeling of "zoning out."
I'm coming off a sleepless night of diaper-changing, rocking and feeding, so focus isn't exactly my forte right now. But after watching the bug languish sadly for a few minutes, I begin to practice some deep, yogic breathing and try to stop my racing thoughts about work, home and deadlines. Sure enough, the band representing my desired brain activity jumps and the red bug begins to rouse himself from his stupor, eat a few flowers and chirp with approval.
After years on the outskirts of medical respectability, neurofeedback has been vindicated by a growing body of evidence showing its potentially remarkable benefits to everyone from elite athletes and musicians to violent criminals and children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). The U.S. National Library of Medicine's database of scholarly articles, for example, contains dozens of positive scientific studies on neurofeedback published in the last two years. The results, from some of the world's top universities and research hospitals, suggest that neurofeedback is a promising treatment for a range of cognitive health issues: seizures, low IQ in kids with learning difficulties, vertigo and tinnitus in the elderly, and substance abuse, even with notoriously addictive, destructive drugs like crack cocaine.
Advocates say neurofeedback has emotional benefits as well. "You feel very good on this," says John Gruzelier, a professor of psychology at the University of London's Goldsmiths College. And all these effects are generated by the patient's brain, not by drugs. No wonder some proponents describe neurofeedback's effects in spiritual, as well as physical, terms.
It all starts with those slimy electrodes attached to the scalp, which pick up a small part of the electrical symphony produced continually in our brains. Neurons, the billions of cells that make up our cerebral cortex and nervous system, transmit information by firing electrical and chemical signals across synapses, the junctions where they meet. These tiny electrical pulses are central to our consciousness and bodily lives: Each time our hearts beat, we blink at a bright light or smile at a bit of good news, that action requires a flurry of electrical activity.
The brain's electrical impulses take the form of waves that researchers categorize by frequency—the number of times they repeat each second (see "Making waves" box). The slowest are the delta waves, which the brain typically produces during deep sleep. Next are theta waves, another slow undulation at four to eight cycles per second, often associated with creative and subconscious thought, which we produce when we're sleepy or daydreaming. We make alpha waves of eight to 12 cycles per second when we're alert and relaxed, and still-faster beta waves when we engage in active problem-solving or become alert or anxious. The fastest patterns, above 30 cycles per second, are made by gamma waves—usually faint and difficult to detect, but associated with high-level thought.
An overabundance or deficiency at one of these frequencies often correlates to conditions such as depression and other emotional disturbances and learning disabilities. Children with ADHD, for example, often have too many slow brain waves (delta or theta) and not enough of the faster waves that allow them to focus, engage and think productively.
Neurofeedback reads these waves, feeds them into a computer and translates them into visual form—in my case, the ladybug's states of lethargy correlate to levels of electrical activity in my brain. The underlying principle is that by seeing your brain waves you can gain control over them, training your brain to produce desired levels of activity, much like you train your voice to produce certain musical notes. And once those brain waves are in play, the desired brain state comes with them. If, for example, you've got too much anxiety-producing beta, try inducing some theta to calm down.
That might sound like trippy science fiction, but it's based on technology that's been around since the German psychiatrist Hans Berger began using electrodes to measure and categorize human brain waves in the 1920s. The recordings of the human brain-wave activity produced by this technology—electroencephalography, or EEG—are the cornerstone of neurofeedback. By the 1970s, it was possible to feed that information back to patients who heard a rewarding tone when they produced a pre-selected frequency of brain waves. What's new is both the sophistication of the feedback display and the precision with which therapists can target different parts of the brain wave spectrum. On top of that, neurofeedback has become cheaper, more efficient and more readily applicable to a vast array of brain disorders.
"When I was doing quantified EEG back in the 1970s, computers were the size of filing cabinets," says James R. Evans, a former University of South Carolina psychology professor and current clinician at the Sterlingworth Center in Greenville, South Carolina. Evans, who has written and edited dozens of articles and books on neurofeedback and is a consulting editor to one of the field's flagship publications, The Journal of Neurotherapy, says those technological hurdles limited neurofeedback's therapeutic reach in the early years: "You had to have a large-scale grant to afford the equipment and electrical engineering people to keep it going."
By the early 1990s, the same technology that brought us personal computers and Xboxes had changed all that, and without huge research investments therapists could focus specifically on brain waves that correlate to mental states. A quantified EEG could show that a patient's brain contained waves outside the normal range, and new software made it easier to create training protocols or use existing ones to boost or reduce activity across a frequency or region of the brain. Neurofeedback began to gain a devoted following of patients and clinicians who swore by its effects. Martin Wuttke is one of those clinicians, a neurofeedback pioneer known for getting remarkable results—starting with himself.
A former heroin addict, Wuttke discovered meditation could help him beat the drugs, and soon he was running meditation and counseling sessions for other addicts. "I found that the key to recovering from addiction was a spiritual experience," Wuttke says. "That's what the Twelve Steps [of Alcoholics and Narcotics Anonymous] are all about, but I felt like that had gotten lost." To facilitate that experience and give it credibility by grounding it in science, Wuttke turned to neurofeedback.
Alcoholics and drug addicts often have too many fast brain waves—which is perhaps why they seek a chemical fix to calm and soothe overactive brains, he says. With the right technology, neurofeedback practitioners believe they can wake up parts of the brain that are too sleepy and calm down regions that are spinning out of control.
For Wuttke, the results were life-changing. As people moved through his program, he says, "Their depressions went away, their pains went away, their anxieties went away." Wuttke believes patients become less likely to backslide once they realize they have access to inner calm without drugs or alcohol, an insight he describes in terms of "awakening."
Neurofeedback's potential hit home when Wuttke's son, Jacob, was born with brain injuries and major developmental problems. "At age 2, he had no muscle tone and some severe difficulties," says Wuttke, "but the pediatric neurologist couldn't give us any answer about why or how to treat him." Wuttke and his wife at the time, Amy O'Dell, took matters into their own hands, developing a comprehensive treatment regime incorporating neurofeedback.Facing the difficulties of asking a child so young to control his brain waves, Wuttke and O'Dell observed the feedback screen and stimulated their son when his brain produced the desired patterns. "We would be very quiet when his brain wasn't within parameters, and then when it was, we would squeeze him and say, 'Good work!' and orient his brain to those moments."
At the beginning of the process, Wuttke describes his toddler son as "hypotonic": unable to sit on his own or hold his head upright. But "within 60 days, his brain started to come alive," Wuttke says, and this cognitive awakening was the first step in a process that soon had his son crawling, walking and running. After witnessing the results, Wuttke and O'Dell established Jacob's Ladder, a school for developmentally challenged children in Atlanta, Georgia, run by O'Dell. Although Jacob couldn't retain five letters of the alphabet at age 6, by age 14 he was reading at a 12th grade level, and the school had achieved national recognition.
That experience helped Wuttke formulate his "neurodevelopmental" approach, in which he uses exercise, dietary supplements and neurofeedback in concert to establish and rewire broken pathways in the brain. Since then, Wuttke has trained thousands of neurofeedback practitioners and garnered a cadre of patients who describe neurofeedback in transformative terms.
Beth Black, for example, fairly raves about the way Wuttke's neurofeedback regimen impacted her 7-year-old son. "Ethan's a completely different kid now," she says. When Black adopted Ethan at 5 months old, he'd already endured severe neglect and suspected pre-natal drug use by his mother, so it wasn't entirely surprising that the boy faced challenges. Still, by the time he entered first grade at age 6 it was clear to Black, director of the Family Art Therapy Center in Clayton, Georgia, that Ethan's problems were cause for serious concern. "We first noticed that when you teased him, he wouldn't understand or react normally, but would have these explosive tantrums," she explains.
Failing socially and academically, Ethan hated school despite the efforts of his teachers and his mother to implement a program of special instruction and behavioral therapy. "He said no one liked him and he wanted to die, and when he would get really upset he would have to exhaust himself before he could get control," Black recalls. A child psychologist labeled Ethan with ADHD and prescribed medication, but Black was desperate to avoid drugs and turned to Wuttke instead. Using an evaluative brain-wave scan, Wuttke determined that Ethan lacked normal levels of beta, the relatively fast waves associated with attention and concentrated thought.
They implemented a training program of neurofeedback and listening therapy to boost this band and improve the boy's concentration, and within two weeks Black was a believer. "For the first time ever, he could tell me a story in sequence; within three weeks, he was scoring 100s on his spelling tests and just blowing us and his teachers away." After seven weeks, Ethan was able to calm himself, and the explosive anger was a thing of the past.
Black was so impressed that she applied for a grant to use neurofeedback with the juvenile offenders sent to her clinic regularly for court-assigned behavioral therapy. Counseling these young offenders had been "a waste of money," according to Black, but the seven juvenile offenders who entered the program of intensive neurofeedback therapy flourished.
"The judge came to us at the end of this program," Wuttke remembers, "and said, 'What did you do to these kids?'" Within weeks those who'd dropped out were back in school, performing so well on standardized tests that their learning disabilities seemed to have disappeared.
Such stories abound. "Our whole family was in trouble because of my daughter's depression and discipline problems," says Joann Bullard, whose daughter received treatment at Wuttke's clinic in the Netherlands. "She was going to have to go on medication because there just weren't any other options," Bullard says, but after 60 sessions of neurotherapy, "there was a total turnaround, and we're grateful every day." Another father, Ben Odukwe, says he visited specialists around the world after his son Onura was diagnosed with mild autism, but saw no real results until the boy entered Jacob's Ladder school and began a neurofeedback program under Wuttke's supervision. Onura's father notes that the boy's "communication, his confidence, his handwriting and dexterity all transformed," and at age 16, he's entering mainstream school for the first time.
Neurofeedback doesn't cure conditions like ADHD, depression or addiction. Instead, it enables people to produce the appropriate brain waves, which helps provide the attention, rest or contemplative awareness needed to deal with underlying issues. You can't manufacture these brain waves by force of will. I quickly discovered that success comes from letting go. "It's not a conscious thing," Wuttke emphasizes. You have to "surrender to the process [and] let your brain take over. You are going to deep parts of the brain and neutralizing disruptive brain waves, and often in this extreme state of quietude, key memories and patterns come up, almost like you're in a half dream state, and there's sort of a rewiring that occurs."
Wuttke likes to say our brain tends to follow certain "scripts," patterns of thought that take us to the same place over and over. Neurofeedback, as it forges new pathways in the brain, helps us devise new scripts.
Even as the technology has advanced and the success stories have grown into a rich anecdotal lore, however, neurofeedback continues to face skepticism and resistance from parts of the medical establishment. It has only begun to gain widespread acceptance as a therapeutic tool recently. "It was an up-and-coming treatment modality in the 1970s," says Evans, who has worked with the technology in academic and clinical settings. But he says neurofeedback lost scientific credibility when the early, simple equipment was adopted by and became associated with "hippies" in pursuit of "instant Zen."
Neurofeedback still has its skeptics among consumers too, especially since it remains unregulated; anyone who can afford the equipment can rent an office, hang a shingle and treat patients (see "How to choose a neurofeedback practitioner" box on page 51). Today, however, Evans says, "We've reached a tipping point where there are hardcore science people working in neurofeedback and articles being published in good journals, and it's becoming much more difficult for mainstream medicine to ignore. No one can say any longer that there is no science behind it."
The studies that have generated the most enthusiasm are the ones suggesting that the treatment offers a drug-free alternative for children with ADHD. A review of the scientific literature in 2005, for example, noted that 75 percent of kids with ADHD treated with neurofeedback improved—compared to about 70 percent treated with drugs—and no study has reported negative effects. A 2007 study from the University Hospital of Tübingen in Germany showed that after a treatment regime lasting several months, children diagnosed with ADHD not only improved their behavior and increased their ability to concentrate "significantly," but added nearly 10 points to their IQs—a result maintained six months after the study ended.
Skeptics have long argued that the benefits of neurofeedback to children with ADHD could be attributed to the placebo effect—or that the children could achieve similar improvement if they spent the same amount of time working with parents on focused tasks like assembling puzzles. By this logic, it isn't the technology of neurofeedback that helps children with ADHD, but the attention and effort of parents and therapists working in concert to support learning and concentration. To find out the truth, Swiss researchers at the University of Zurich created a controlled study to isolate neurofeedback from other factors. One group of children with ADHD was given neurofeedback, while another entered an intensive behavioral therapy program that used traditional techniques to teach them to focus. The results were dramatic: Children in the neurofeedback trial improved markedly on indices of attention and "metacognition" (the awareness of one's mental processes), whereas children in the behavioral therapy group showed no significant improvement.
But there was just one caveat. The researchers noted that the results seemed "mediated by unspecific factors, such as parental support or certain properties of the therapeutic setting and content." So, while neurofeedback works, it isn't a magic bullet—parental support and the right clinical setting, which might include other therapies, are key to realizing its potential.
Importantly, however, that potential goes beyond the treatment of disorders. Indeed, neurofeedback seems remarkably effective at improving mental focus and concentration, even for apparently "normal" individuals. "We've just done a study training eye surgeons," says Gruzelier of Goldsmiths College in London, "and we found that the rhythm that's very effective in reducing hyperactivity in ADHD children also helped enhance surgical performance by 20 percent." The aim was to do the surgery as quickly and accurately as possible, and neurofeedback training, which enhanced beta waves while relaxing the cerebral cortex to reduce hyperactive movements, seemed to enhance surgeons' ability to modulate their performance. "Instead of just charging at the target," Gruzelier says, "they were actually slightly longer and more methodical in their preparatory time, then faster and more accurate on task."
Athletes and performers often associate such success with being "in the zone." Many athletes believe neurofeedback allows them to pause racing thoughts and live wholly in the moment of the game. Prominent among them is Chris Kamen, the center for the Los Angeles Clippers basketball team, who was diagnosed with ADHD as a child and struggled in his early career, despite his imposing seven-foot height. In 2007, he discovered neurofeedback and soon improved his scoring and rebounding by more than 50 percent. As important, Kamen says, his life off the court improved as he stopped making impulsive decisions.
Kamen not only attributed the success to neurofeedback, but became a spokesperson for Hope139, a Michigan company dedicated to bringing neurofeedback technology into schools and businesses to improve performance. Neurofeedback has gained such a lustrous reputation that the Italian professional soccer team A.C. Milan has created a glassed-in "mind room," where the team gathers for mental tune-ups. In the mind room, players watch their brain waves play out across a computer screen while a team of sports psychologists monitors their progress.
Gruzelier emphasizes that neurofeedback's performance-enhancing results go beyond relaxation or the relief of anxiety—effects that might be achieved with sedatives or more conventional relaxation techniques. "We've compared this to other techniques that have reduced anxiety but have not enhanced performance in the same way," says Gruzelier, citing his studies of professional dancers and musicians who did neurofeedback training to quiet the brain's fast-wave activity and produce more slow theta waves. These studies showed remarkable improvements "not only in artistry, but communication, the way people expressed themselves, the presence they have on stage."
Elite students at the Royal College of Music in London improved their performance an average 17 percent, according to a panel of independent judges, and competitive ballroom dancers achieved "professionally significant" improvement in just five weeks. Moreover, Gruzelier notes his recent research hasn't only replicated these results, but shown they extend to novice performers. "There are dramatic improvements," he says. "Breath and pitch improve. Where they didn't sing in tune to begin with, they did afterwards."
Gruzelier attributes such results to the technology's ability to allow slow waves to travel farther, uninterrupted, across the brain. That facilitates interaction between areas of the brain that don't typically connect, he says. Normally, such a process is disrupted by the fast waves that characterize our waking life–a kind of mental static. "It's been known for centuries that the hypnagogic experience, the border between waking and sleeping, is the source of remarkable insights," Gruzelier says.
Neurofeedback's apparent ability to bring those insights into the light, however, is what seems remarkable, especially since we still don't understand key factors about how it works—how, for example, people control their own brain waves. "It's very much a black box," explains John Kounios, a professor of psychology at Drexel University in Pennsylvania.
Kounios conducted a double-blind study of elderly subjects that showed neurofeedback may help improve cognitive processing speed and "executive function," the mental operations that help us plan and organize our lives, but he admits the cognitive process underlying neurofeedback is still something of a mystery. "Although neurofeedback has been around for 40 years, we still don't have the slightest clue as to how people do this," Kounios says. "It's not as if there aren't any good theories. There are just no theories, not even bad ones–just the observation that this is something animals and humans can do."
That sometimes makes for surprising results, as in the case of Kounios' study, which increased the production of alpha waves in the frontal lobes of elderly people. The frontal lobe often deteriorates as people age, which makes problem-solving, abstract reasoning and all kinds of planning more difficult. And so, as Kounios' subjects boosted their alpha activity in this region of the brain, they demonstrated an improved ability to respond when presented with new information and to make quick decisions in cognitive tests. Such results are preliminary but exciting. Kounios emphasizes that the field needs funding for large-scale studies that can establish the basic science of neurofeedback and determine which training protocols are most effective, "but there's no question in my mind that this has significant potential and the phenomena are real."
This is a common refrain among researchers and practitioners. "It works," agrees Evans. "Almost anybody can get the equipment and get 60 percent good results. The question is, what are those people doing who get 90 percent? Some people give vitamins along with their treatment; others pray with clients or use counseling. In many respects, these people fire a shotgun and we don't know which pellets hit."


That's why Wuttke is creating an institution that will train a core group of people who can replicate his results and methods. His mission is to establish a network of neurofeedback clinics and training facilities in Europe through his work with the LifeWorks Foundation.
"One of the biggest risks right now is that this becomes a novelty, where people can buy some software and hook into it at home and play a game," says Wuttke. "That's going to happen, but it takes away from the profound clinical applications, which have to be part of a more comprehensive approach."
Wyatt agrees. "For most patients, whether they're suffering from depression or post-traumatic stress syndrome, I don't believe that neurofeedback offers a complete solution any more than I believe a doctor can give you a drug that offers a complete solution. Neurofeedback can calm the brain down, but then you still often have to deal with underlying issues."
The desire to get at those underlying issues is why Wuttke, an ordained non-denominational minister, keeps coming back to the notion of spiritual growth. "When you incorporate all these things and straighten out the brain, the ultimate goal is for people's spiritual awareness to start manifesting itself," he says. Indeed, recent studies of Tibetan Buddhist monks by Richard Davidson, director of the Lab for Affective Neuroscience at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, have shown links between spirituality and the processes encouraged by neurofeedback. In particular, monks who are experts in meditation seem capable of generating extraordinary levels of gamma waves as they achieve a state typically associated with "transcendence."
From a materialist perspective, the key seems to be neurofeedback's ability to help us connect memories and sense perceptions that have been laid down in disparate regions of the brain—to achieve the feeling of unified consciousness by unifying the brain's electrical impulses. But if neurofeedback can foster and even enhance such a state, this begs the question of whether the phenomena we typically describe in terms of "spirituality" are just physical by-products of a material mind.
Wuttke turns such skepticism on its head. "The way I look at it," he says, "we may be able to map an experience through physiology, whether it is a profound sense of peace or a religious sense, but that doesn't mean the material brain is the source of those experiences." Instead, he sees the brain as "a transformer, something that conducts energy between metaphysical and physical reality." He admits neurofeedback can't necessarily help any Joe off the street achieve the transcendence of a Tibetan yogi, but adds, "It has been my experience that everybody is enlightened; they just don't know it."
After my first session of neurofeedback therapy, there's little chance I'll be confused with one of the enlightened—something my wife readily confirms. But as I watched the red bug move with increasing dexterity about the screen, it certainly felt empowering to see how much control we can exert over our minds, moods and selves. Over the next few weeks, it's a sensation I'll recall during moments of stress, like the long nights with my ever-wakeful children. Just this recollection seems to have some tangible effect, slowing the quickening pulse and quieting the static I've seen in the graphic representations of my brain waves. As Wuttke would say, we can sometimes be locked into old scripts, reacting to our world in ways we don't understand or seem to control. Neurofeedback's potential is so inspiring, in part, because it can help us rescript our brains and, thus, rewrite our lives...."

Blaine Greteman, who trains the brains of undergraduates as a professor at Oklahoma State University, wrote about micro power generation in the September 2008 issue.



Dec. 3rd, 2010

HEMOENCEFALOGRAFIA - nowa metoda w NEUROTERAPII




Szanowni Państwo,

Niniejszym proponuję lekturę artykułu autorstwa Lynn BLACKETT z "YORK BIOFEEDBACK CENTER".
Artykuł w sposób szczegółowy opisuje metodę HEG BIOFEEDBACKU. Atutem tej publikacji jest interesująco opisany fizjologiczny mechanizm, tej formy Biofeedbacku.

Z Szacunkiem

Dariusz Wyspiański 


 "Hemoencephalography:
A New Form of Neurofeedback" 
 Glyn Blackett
YORK biofeedback CENTRE
 
Introduction
Neurofeedback is a means of training brain functioning, either to ameliorate symptoms of a
disorder or to improve performance.The trainee is presented with some measure of
brain activity, and tries to influence the signal in a desired direction.

What specifically to we mean by activity and how do we measure it?

In “traditional” neurofeedback
we monitor the brain’s electrical activity - called

the electroencephalograph.
Hemoencephalography (HEG) is a more recent development which is based on a different way of
quantifying brain activity.
The Physiological Basis of HEG
One way to quantify brain activity is in terms of
metabolic activity or metabolic rate. In fact this
concept has widespread applicability in the field
of neuroimaging. Metabolism is a cellular process
in which “fuel” in the form of glucose or sugar is
“burned” to release energy for use by the cell.
The process consumes oxygen and creates carbon
dioxide. Metabolic rate is the rate at which energy
is used up.
When the brain is engaged in some mental task
such as mental arithmetic, we expect that those
regions of the brain directly involved in the task
will use energy at a faster rate than other regions.
The human brain is extremely metabolically
active. Although the brain makes up just 2% of
body weight, it accounts for 20% of the body’s
oxygen consumption and 25% of glucose
consumption. In order to meet this energy
demand, brain tissue has an extremely dense
network of blood vessels and capillaries.
How do we measure metabolic rate? We can
measure it indirectly, in a number of ways. Some
of these ways rely on a phenomenon known as
neurovascular coupling.
Neurovascular Coupling
Metabolic activity depends upon a supply of
glucose and oxygen, which arrive via the
bloodstream. Neurovascular coupling is a
mechanism for matching blood flow to metabolic
demand in the brain. This means that whenever
there is a localised increase in neural activity
(which happens when the brain engages in some
specific mental task) there is a rapid localised
increase in cerebral blood flow. A consequence of
this response is that the blood in the active region
becomes more oxygenated (i.e. the concentration
of oxygen increases).
The process is managed by cells called astrocytes
- these are a common type of glial cell or support
cell in the brain.

Brain Scanning

There are two broad classes of brain scanners -
those that reveal structure and those that look at
activity. Here we’re concerned with the latter.
These scanners indirectly measure metabolic
activity. Typically they’re used in research to try
to infer which regions of the brain are involved in
particular tasks.
PET2 & SPECT3 measure the relative rates at
which glucose (the brain’s fuel) is used up.
Glucose which has been tagged with radioactive
atoms is injected into the subject’s bloodstream.
The fate of this glucose is tracked by measuring
the radiation it emits. Relatively more of it is
delivered to the more active regions of the brain.
Functional MRI or fMRI4 detects the localised
increases in blood oxygenation mentioned above.
This increase in oxygenation level changes the
magnetic properties of the blood, and this change
can be detected when the brain is subjected to a
strong magnetic field.
HEG
Like fMRI, HEG also detects changes in brain
activation by detecting changes in blood
oxygenation.
Let’s summarise the process:
A mental task activates neurons in some
particular region of the brain.
These neurons consume relatively more
energy
This demand for energy is met by a localised
increase in blood flow.
The local oxygenation level of the blood
increases.
There are actually two forms of HEG, each form
having its own sensor. They measure different
aspects of the one process (metabolic activation),
and hence have a similar range of appication and
achieve similar results.
Near Infra-Red HEG
Near infra-red (NIR) HEG is historically the first
form. It was invented by Dr Hershel Toomim. He
adapted a method called Infra-red Spectroscopy.
His original contribution was to realise that the
signal he was measuring could be consciously
influenced and hence was useful in a context of
biofeedback training.
The NIR device shines a light source into the
head, most typically at the forehead (in part
because hair obstructs the signal). The light is a
mixture of red and infra-red wavelengths. A
proportion of this light is bounced back out by a
physical process called scattering. The device
then measures this scattered light.
This is possible because the scalp, skull and brain
matter (both grey and white) are relatively
translucent to light of this wavelength. Blood,
however, is not. Furthermore, the proportions of
the light absorbed and scattered by blood depend
on its level of oxygenation. This means that as the
local oxygenation level of blood increases in
response to neural activation, the signal from the
device changes. Thus the device can detect
changes in the brain’s activation level.
Dr Toomim found a very good correlation
between his device and fMRI, which also relies
upon changes in blood oxygenation.
The device can’t give absolute measurements of
activity. The signal is affected by factors such as
skull thickness - so we can’t compare one person
to another. But it can detect changes happening
over a short time scale, which is all we need in
order to be able to train activation.
The current generation of NIR HEG sensor only
detects activity in the brain’s outer layer - the
cortex. It is possible that future developments
may allow training of structures much deeper in
the brain.
Passive Infra-Red HEG
Passive Infra-Red or PIR HEG is conceptually
much simpler. It was invented by Dr Jeffrey
Carmen, who adapted a technique called
thermoscopy. The sensor detects light (or
electromagnetic radiation) of a particular
wavelength - a small band within the infra-red
(IR) part of the spectrum. This IR radiation is
essentially heat being radiated by the brain. The
sources are firstly local metabolic activity (sugar
being burned for energy release) and secondly,
local blood flow. This heat is detected in other
forms of thermal imaging - in fact thermal
cameras have been used to assess the effects of

HEG training

Comparison with EEG Neurofeedback

Compared to EEG neurofeedback HEG has these
advantages:
The signal is much simpler to interpret: it
either increases or decreases in magnitude
(corresponding to increases and decreases in
brain activation, respectively).
The signal is more stable (EEG measures tend
to fluctuate rapidly and seemingly quite
randomly)
 
The signal is much less subject to
contamination by artefact.
Dr Toomim claims that clinical benefits are
achieved more rapidly.
Training HEG
In HEG neurofeedback, the trainee tries to
increase the signal, which is equivalent to
activating the region of the brain under the
sensor. To achieve this (at least for the forehead
placement) the trainee looks for:
an intensely alert or awake state of mind
a firm intention or desire that the signal
increase, but at the same time
a relaxed, open, emotionally positive state -
not getting too hooked into getting results
because frustration tends to lead to
deactivation.
Applications of HEG Neurofeedback
HEG is still a new neurofeedback modality and
much work needs to be done in researching the
applications. Here I’ll consider three areas where
HEG is already proving itself:
ADD
Depression
Migraine
The Prefrontal Cortex
One thing that links these disorders is the
possibility of dysregulation of the Prefrontal
Cortex (PFC).
The PFC is the region of the cortex (outer layer of
brain) behind the forehead, and also above the
eyeballs (on the underside of the brain). The PFC
is a particularly important part of the brain, most
highly evolved in humans, and sometimes
described as the brain’s executive control centre7.
It plays a central role in purposive behaviour -
making decisions, formulating and carrying out
plans and intentions, and sticking to them in the
face of distracting stimuli. It coordinates the brain
resources needed to carry out these intentions,
and evaluates actions in terms of their success or
failure in meeting objectives.
For instance, suppose one day it is time for your
evening meal. You’ll formulate a plan for
meeting that need - you decide to cook a meal,
and then decide what to cook. The PFC is
responsible for formulating the steps needed to
meet this goal - e.g. first get the pans and utensils
out. The PFC accesses the knowledge you need -
for example your memory of where you keep
your pans. Suppose the phone rings while you’re
cooking - you decide to answer it, but hold your
intentions in mind so that you can come back to
cooking when you’re finished on the phone.
The PFC is also strongly linked to motivation and
emotion (these are of course connected). You can
keep to a long-term plan (e.g. gaining a degree)
by somehow holding in mind the good feelings
connected to achieving that goal.
The PFC has the ability to inhibit other structures
in the brain connected to emotions, enabling you
to for example override a fear of heights when
you need to climb a ladder.
Emotions are connected decision-making - it
seems that the PFC arrives at decisions by in
some way “imagining” the feelings that would
result from each option.8
The PFC is especially relevant to social emotions
because our ability to imagine what other people
are thinking and feeling depends upon the PFC.
Figure 2: Images taken with a thermal camera, before (left) and after (right) a single
session of HEG training. The subject has AD/HD. Note the increase in temperature
seen over the whole forehead. Images courtesy of Dr. Robert Coben.
4
ADD
The behaviours described in the preceding section
are just those that people with ADD find difficult
- in short their problems are distractibility,
impulsiveness, disorganisation, short attention
span and quite commonly emotional difficulties
too.
ADD is a real neurological disorder, and typically
results in dysregulation of the PFC. The root of
the problem may lie in other parts of the attention
system (which includes many areas in the brain) -
for example the dopamine pathway that acts
something like the PFC’s power supply. PFC
function seems to be relatively easily
dysregulated since it is at the top of the brain’s
organisational tree.
Brain scanning studies have shown difficient
activty in the PFC of ADD sufferers, and is
sometimes seen to deactivate further during tasks
requiring concentrated attention, for which you
would normally see an increase in PFC activity.
Though still a new form of therapy, HEG
neurofeedback is showing promising results for
ADD.
Depression
Depressed people typically suffer from
diminished energy and motivation and poor
focus. Some experience emotional flatness, others
strongly painful emotions. All these symptoms
can be linked to dysregulation in the PFC.
Training increased activity in the PFC can be a
good idea for depression, firstly because it’s often
under-active9, and secondly since it plays a role in
regulating other emotional centres in the brain.
As with ADD, the PFC dysregulation may be
contingent upon problems somewhere else in the
brain, but that need not undermine the potential
benefit of training PFC activation.
Migraine
Dr Jeffrey Carmen developed PIR HEG
specifically to treat migraine, with encouraging
results. He treated 100 migraineurs with PIR
HEG over a four-year period.10 Over 90% of
subjects who completed at least 6 sessions
reported significant improvement in migraines.
‘Significant improvement’ was the point at which
it became difficult to identify headaches as
migraines - i.e substantially reduced pain levels.
Typically both pain levels and frequency of
migraine improved. (24 people dropped out of
therapy before 6 sessions for various reasons
including financial.) 61% experienced significant
improvement after six sessions or less.
The underlying neuropathology of migraine
remains unknown. Dr Carmen’s theory for the
efficacy of PIR HEG is that training strengthens
the PFC’s inhibitory control over some part of the
brain stem thought to generate migraines.
Notes
1 See http://www.acnp.org/G4/
GN401000064/CH064.HTML
2 PET is an acronym of Positron Emission
Tomography.
3 SPECT is an acronym of Single Photon
Emission Computed Tomography.
4 fMRI stands for functional Magnetic
Resonance Imaging.
5 Source: course notes in training delivered
by Dr Ernesto Korenman.
6 See Toomim’s paper, ‘HEG Talk 1: A
Conceptual Introduction to HEG’
available online at:
www.biocompresearch.org/articles.htm
7 Elkhonon Goldberg’s book ‘The
Executive Brain’ (2001) is devoted to the
topic.
8 Antonio Damasio explores this idea in his
books, especially ‘Descartes’ Error’
(1994).
9 See Amen (2003), for example
10 Dr Carmen describes his results in a
paper, ‘Passive Infrared
Hemoencephalography: Four Years and
100 Migraines’, originally published in
the Journal of Neurotherapy and also
published in Tinius (2004).
Bibliography
Amen, D. (2003) ‘Healing Anxiety and
Depression’, Putnam
Damasio, A. (1994) ‘Descartes’ Error’, Putnam
Goldberg, E. (2001) ‘The Executive Brain:
Frontal Lobes and the Civilized Mind’,
Oxford University Press
Tinnius, T. (Ed.) (2004) ‘New Developments in
Blood Flow Hemoencephalography’, The
Haworth Press..." 
 


Nov. 18th, 2010

HEG NEUROTERAPIA w procesie leczenia migreny –doniesienia z badań





Szanowni Państwo,

Mam przyjemność przedstawić ciekawy artykuł pochodzący z czasopisma
Journal of Neurothrapy, v. 8 #3, styczen 2005, pp. 23-51. dotyczący badań nad efektywnością neuroterapii HEG w leczeniu migreny.

Zachęcam do lektury

Dariusz Wyspiański



"PASSIVE INFRARED HEMO-ENCEPHALOGRAPHY: Four Years and 100 Migraines


Jeffrey A. Carmen

Abstract

Background. One hundred migraine sufferers were treated using passive Infrared Hemo-encephalography (pIR HEG) over a period of four years. All subjects met the criteria for at least one of the categories set forth in the International Headache Society (IHS, 1988) classification criteria for headache disorders for primary migraine.

Methods. Subjects were treated using the pIR HEG system in 30minute sessions. A central forehead placement (approximately Fpz) was used for the sensor assembly for all subjects. Changes in headache patterns were examined. After two years, an infrared video imaging system was added to the data collection process and was available for 61 of the 100 subjects. Infrared forehead images were captured at the start and end of each session to examine changes in prefrontal cortical brain activity.

Results. Most of the subjects improved control over their migraine headaches. Over 90% of those subjects who completed at least six sessions reported significant improvements in migraine activity.

Conclusions. HEG appears to have a strong impact on migraine headaches, even for people who have not had a positive response to medication. Headache response by the end of six sessions appears to be a good predictor of probability of improvement.

J. Neurothrapy, v. 8 #3, January 2005, pp. 23-51..."


Nov. 3rd, 2010

Czym jest HEMOENCEFALOGRAFIA (HEG BIOFEEDBACK)






Szanowni Państwo,

HEMOENCAFALOGRAFIA (znana pod nazwą HEG BIOFEEDBACKU) to coraz dynamiczniej roziwijący się obszar neuroterapii. HEG bazuje na odczycie poziomu ukrwienia struktur płatów czołowych mózgu. Rejestrowany poziom ukrwienia jest odzwierciedleniem stanu organizumu, podobnie jak rytm fal EEG.
Rejestracja Hemoencefalograficzna jest znacznie mniej podatna na zakłócenia w porównaniu z zapisem EEG i generalnie prostsza w zastosowaniu z perspektywy pacjenta.

Pozwalam sobie na zacytowanie opisu HEG BIOFEEDBACKU pochodzącego ze strony BIOFEEDBACK INSTITUTE OF LOS ANGELES.
Od siebie dodam, iż w Polsce urządzenia do HEG BIOFEEDBACKU stają się coraz bardziej popularne.

Z Szacunkiem

Dariusz Wyspiański





"What is HemoEncephaloGraphy?

HEG (hemoencephalography) is the study of blood flow in the brain. More specifically, it is the study of voluntarily controlled blood flow or oxygenation in specifically chosen brain areas. Certain areas of the brain do certain things. The prefrontal cortex is involved with executive functions such as short-term attention and organizing; the temporal lobes are involved with memory functions, auditory processing, word finding and emotional responses and the parietal lobes are involved with direction. Brain anatomy and biology are important elements to the understanding of brain function.

Certain brain areas are associated with specific learning, behavioral or emotional challenges. For example, executive/organizational failures and impulse control issues are generally marked by prefrontal cortex trouble. Memory challenges, mood swings including temper (anger) issues and word finding trouble, usually indicate problems in temporal lobes. People who get lost easily may have issues in the parietal region of the brain. Once we know your challenge we can target your brain exercise training.

Blood brings oxygen and the basic nutrient glucose at life sustaining levels to all parts of the brain. Our brains have an amazing ability to supply extra blood preferentially to areas in current use. Even in repose the brain uses 1/5 of all the energy used in the body. Brain temperature rises in the used (venous) blood. If we used the entire brain at one time it would overheat and be severely damaged. The flow of blood cools the brain and prevents overheating.

Active brain areas are marked by high oxygen density and higher than normal temperature. Simple measurements can locate active areas. Note here that we have no sense that tells us where an active area is located. For example when we stand, activity occurs in the motor strip across the top of the head. We have no sensation with information about the exact location of that active bit of tissue.

From infancy on, we have learned to use specific bits of brain tissue for accomplishing familiar tasks. We carry out the same learning process for anything new. We may want to do something we see others do or we try to do something that seems possible. Initially we accomplished it by trial and error. In trying, we find some modicum of success. We are encouraged so we try again and again. We improve as we go.

What is HEG Neurofeedback: Girl with Green Shirt and HEG HeadbandFortunately, we can use a sophisticated infrared thermometer, passive infrared HEG (pirHEG), developed by my esteemed colleague, Jeffrey A. Carmen, or an optical probe, near infrared HEG (nirHEG) developed by the originator of HEG Hershel Toomim, that shines light through the skin and skull to assess the color of brain tissue. Oxygenated arterial blood is red, deoxygenated venous blood is blue. Increased demand for nutrition results in faster blood flow and redder blood in the tissues.

With these facts in mind we have HEG - an outstanding method of providing neurofeedback...."




Oct. 4th, 2010

BIOFEEDBACK W NASA


Szanowni Państwo,

Polecam film ukazujący aspekty zastosowania BIOFEEDBACKU na potrzeby procesu przygotowań amerykańskich astronautów.

Z Szacunkiem

Dariusz Wyspiański










Sep. 28th, 2010

Czym jest WILD DIVINE ?




Szanowni Państwo,

WILD DIVINE to niezwykle ciekawy zestaw do samodzielnej relaksacji bazujący na standardach BIOFEEDBACKU HRV i GSR.
Jest to urządzenie łatwe w obsłudzie, bardzo czytelne w zakresie softwaru i ciekawe w kontekscie grafiki.
Oto kilka przykładów opinii i rekomendacji WILD DIVINE :


Wild Divine Reviews:

Newsweek
"Can video games help kids? Mission accomplished."

Busniness Week
"Leading the way... games that promote health"

CNN
"Groundbreaking ... it works - and it's actually a heck of a fun experience."

Family Circle
"Sheer bliss is exploring Wild Divine ... it blocked out
the noisy room and turned off the chatter in my head."


Yoga Journal
"Turns the quest for calm into entertainment."

Mac World
GAME HALL OF FAME:
"Without a question one of the most memorable games of the year."


Ze swej strony dodam, iż zestaw sprawdza się w pracy z osobami, poszukującymi spokoju, nowej energii i siły, mającymi problemy z nadmiarem stresu i napięć .....

Z Szacunkiem

Dariusz Wyspiański

Sep. 7th, 2010

UZDRAWIAJACA MOC NEUROFEEDBACKU

 

Szanowni Państwo,

Niniejszym pozwalam sobie na zarekomendowanie znakomitej ksiązki autorstwa Ph.d. Stephena Larsena "The Healing Power of Neurofeedback" ("Uzdrawiajaca moc Neurofeedbacku").

Jednoczesnie polecam artykuł pt: "A quite mind is a winning mind" ("Spokojny umysł jest zwycięskim umysłem"),który cytuję poniżej:

Z Szacunkiem

Dariusz Wyspiański




"A quiet mind is a winning mind.

That's why the players of the Italian soccer team AC Milan gather every two weeks in the Mind Room, a glassed-in facility at the team's chic training complex. There, on zero-gravity recliners, listening to the soothing sounds of New Age music, they unwind. In a way. Each player's head is fitted out with miniature electrodes that send a signal from his scalp to a computer, so while he relaxes he can also watch his brain waves play out, like a video game, as brightly colored zigs and zags on a monitor.

Every once in a while, an aberrant wave pattern flickers across the screen. The penalty kick missed against Juventus? Anger at being benched? When these sudden spikes appear, the player's job is to use all of his mental discipline to banish the discordant thought—the anxiety response of the brain to a negative memory—and return to a neutral, open state, optimal for performance. Behind a wall of glass, the team's sports psychologists watch the zigzagging lines too, the alpha, beta, and theta waves of the human mind in action, evaluating their stars' focus and occasionally sending calming words through their earpieces.

This procedure is called neurofeedback training. Many athletes swear by it and say it improves their performance, among them the tennis champion Mary Pierce and the Olympic gold-medal skier Hermann Maier, not to mention various players on the 2006 World Cup champion Italian soccer team. The goal of neurofeedback, which is becoming increasingly popular for professionals and amateurs alike, is to train the brain so that an athlete stays focused in competition. Experts have shown that a state of calm neutrality can help players perform better. The idea is that we damage ourselves when we can't get past our irritations and, especially, our remembered failures—our airballs, unforced errors, or pushed one-foot putts. Think of Chuck Knoblauch, the Yankee second baseman whose first surprising throwing errors in the late 1990s started a negative feedback loop—ball after ball sailing into the stands until the former Gold Glove prematurely retired after the 2002 season. Neurofeedback tries to block this downward spiral of self-destructive doubting. When it works, it helps the player find "the zone" and stay in it. The notion that freedom from stress will make you a better athlete is hardly new. "You must swing smoothly to play golf well and you must be relaxed to swing smoothly," Bobby Jones said decades ago. Thinking has always been stinking. But two things have changed since Jones's time to make interventions like neurofeedback feasible. We can now define a relaxed state of mind with precision, and we seem to have proof that, once relaxed, the brain can be taught to stay that way.

The history of neurofeedback goes back to the Russian physiologist Ivan Pavlov and his conditioning experiments with dogs. Then, in the sixties, the sleep researcher Barry Sterman found that he was able to train cats to produce a particular brain wave called a sensorimotor response (SMR), which created a kind of suspended focus, a feline version of "the zone." Sterman would go on to help found the discipline of neurofeedback in the seventies at UCLA, when EEG machines—electroencephalography is the grandfather of the discipline—were as big as refrigerators, with electrodes like suction cups. Today, the standard neurofeedback EEG amplifier is no bigger than a USB hub and the electrodes look like the earbuds from an iPod. A coach can carry a neurofeedback kit in his bag and clean up a player's mind in a hotel room or at halftime. As a result, neurofeedback is going on nearly everywhere.

Neurofeedback techniques vary, but all the protocols depend on this: The brain tells its tales in the wavelengths of electrical currents-—alpha and SMR (relaxed openness and focus); beta (multitasking efficiency, but also anxiety and self-talk); and theta (wandering mind). The core tenet of neurofeedback is that, with training, the underlying processes that result in brain waves can be modified at the behest of their possessor, improving performance and function.

At the Mind Room, which is run with Opus Dei?like secrecy (my request to give it a test spin wasn't so much denied as smothered by layers of bureaucracy), soccer players like to choose a user interface in which they try to make an animated robot run. Afterward they compare speeds—in effect, the player with the most alpha and fewest beta and theta waves wins. But a curious thing about neurofeedback is that one does not improve by trying to improve—at least not directly. Type-A personalities be warned: One cannot simply power one's way to a quieter mind. In a book by Jim Robbins called A Symphony in the Brain, Sterman describes the ideal neurofeedback condition as "a standby state for the motor system. You might think of it as a VCR; it's a pause button." A typical neurofeedback treatment lasts for roughly 20 to 40 sessions of an hour each, and then—so the theory goes—the patient has permanently changed the makeup of his mind. He can now hit "pause" at will.

As I began looking into neurofeedback over the past year, it did seem to me that perhaps the mind really can be shaped into an incredibly cooperative and flexible instrument when its possessor is motivated. I read in Gazzetta dello Sport that AC Milan defender Dario Simic, who scored a clutch goal against Argentina in last summer's World Cup, said he owed it all to the Mind Room. Then later at the Washington, D.C.?area office of a practitioner named Deborah Stokes, I ran into a Morgan Stanley wealth manager who claimed that since he'd started neurofeedback his tennis game had soared. "It's as if the ball had slowed down," he told me. "It's just very clear that I expect to win." That convinced me. The money guy hadn't even gone in for sports training—he'd gone because of concentration problems at work.

The idea that I, too, could gain a competitive edge without steroids, supplements, or endless practice seemed appealing. I am an avid swimmer, although one beset by repeated injuries that have made it increasingly hard to enjoy the sport, let alone truly excel at it. On Italian TV, the head psychologist of the Mind Room had said that the difference between the stress felt by great athletes and ordinary ones was "quantity, not quality."

My first stop was with Ray Pavlov, a neurofeedback practitioner in Montreal. He and his wife, Nicolina, have trained many of Canada's practitioners. I had expected to be in a large sanitized environment, a Canadian version of the Mind Room. Instead, the Pavlovs work out of three tiny rooms above a bagel store. I had been told that Pavlov was the grandson of the famous physiologist, but he was evasive on the point.

For the current Dr. Pavlov, a former oncologist, neurofeedback is more than just, say, a toy for winning the gold in Beijing next year. It represents the possibility of subverting what he called "the official mentality of pills and hip replacements." I got the impression that, for Pavlov, neurofeedback is like a better version of homeopathy, prayer, or meditation—better because it can be quantified. "We can teach you how to go into alpha objectively," he told me with quiet, doctorly certainty.

Soon Pavlov's wife, Nicolina, had me under a chenille blanket in a large chair behind a chenille curtain. The scene was very MittelEurope. I expected Harry Lyme to pop out to zither music.

Nicolina attached clips to my ears—one electrode on the top of my head and another on my forehead—and I began to watch my brain on a TV screen. It is a strange sensation the first time you see your mind looking like, of all things, a video game. My strengths, weaknesses, phobias, and obsessions all opened up as a riot of digitalized pulsing bar graphs—pinks, reds, and blues all racing toward nothing. Nicolina had also connected sensors to my index finger and around my waist to measure heart-rate variability and respiration. She taught me—successfully—how to raise my body temperature by imagining that my hands were in hot water: Because athletes are more relaxed, she told me, they have higher peripheral body temperatures than nonathletes. She next tried to show me how to get my breathing and heartbeat in sync, something many athletes can do. Then we worked on getting my beta down and my alpha up, but with limited success. "Chatterbox beta," she tsked me. She showed me my shameful beta-to-alpha coefficient on the screen. It was 30 percent above average. "Writers, people like you, always have the chatterbox brain."

Practitioners say that neurofeedback could potentially improve not just our athletic skills but our professional ones—our sense of organization, how we deal with setbacks, even how we respond when the kids refuse to go to bed. Who would not want a quiet mind on demand? But performance is notoriously hard to measure. The intervention of the neurofeedback practitioner, critics say, is itself often sufficient to bring about improvement. In other words, the placebo effect of just walking into the Mind Room might be enough to make a Milano striker play better. Even Sterman urges caution. "I think neurofeedback is a powerful tool," he told me. But what is still needed "is more research funding in order to get academic labs involved instead of clinicians trying to make a living." Even so, all over America athletes have been quietly training their brains. Almost none will talk about it.

I asked the premier manufacturer of the equipment why. "They don't want their competitors to know they do it," Larry Klein, cofounder of Thought Technology in Montreal, told me. "Because then they would do it too, and take away their advantage." By some estimates there are thousands of neurofeedback practitioners in North America. Many treat epilepsy and attention deficit disorder (sometimes covered by major insurers), while others devote at least part of their practices to improving clients' sports, artistic, or business skills.

The day after my session with the Pavlovs, I found myself at a tennis club outside Toronto in Burlington, Ontario, with Sue Wilson, a top neurofeedback sports expert and a professor of health sciences at York University. A Canadian tennis coach, Pierre Lamarche, had asked Wilson to come and evaluate a young tennis hopeful. Nineteen-year-old Katy Shulaeva had twice been Canada's National Junior Champion, and on Lamarche's Web site she had written that her dream was to be "the number-one player in the world." At the moment, though, she was No. 400.

That is not to say she wasn't good. I watched her practice against another one of Lamarche's teen protégées. To my eye, they looked evenly matched. But their coach did not think so. "If they played, Katy would beat her easily," he told me. And when I looked again, I could see what he meant. Katy's strokes were good, but her game was even better: Everything was natural and nothing caused her excitement. She was like a zebra bounding through a savannah.

The question before Katy's handlers, then, was, Why wasn't she getting better results in competition? Lamarche thought it might be because she had had several recent injuries, and the aim that day was to see whether they had affected her brain or body or both. Wilson put her in a chair in the club's offices and hooked her up. Katy, it turned out, could easily do what I hadn't done at the Pavlovs'—match her breathing to her heartbeat. It made me wonder if athletes have some kind of innate concentration advantage. The graphic Katy had chosen was a bay of blue water. The tips of the waves shaded toward pink, but the goal was to keep everything blue. Her skinny body lax, Katy seemed to be looking at nothing and everything. Her eyes were glassy and her mind seemed distant. Wilson and I talked across her with no effect: Only Lamarche's praise tinged the waves pink—how players crave the love of their coaches, even it distracts them from the task at hand! But in no time Katy got right back into blue.

According to some studies, the ability to shift attention quickly is an optimal state for athletes, because the most mentally fit are the ones who can recover the fastest from short bursts of intense concentration. Watching Katy, I felt I wasn't just learning about neurofeedback, but how a well-conditioned athletic brain actually works. "I don't even know how I do it," she said. I thought of John McEnroe, how his tantrums gave way so suddenly to complete concentration on the court that many thought the anger itself was faked to intimidate umpires and opponents.

Katy's test impressed me. Her mind was pretty quiet, so Wilson and Lamarche came to realize that her problems were physical and decided to add a large dose of sports massage and yoga to her regimen. So, in this case, neurofeedback helped identify an area where an athlete needed additional training. Now, as Katy left with a friend to go see Borat, it was my turn. With Wilson's help, I gradually figured out how to lower my thetas by quieting the images in my mind and focusing on getting a flower to open on the screen. Anytime I let other thoughts wander into my mind—my flight home, my children, how much I wanted to beat Katy at neurofeedback—the flower would stop opening. But I soon became adept at returning to zoning out and making the petals open. Wilson was pleased and I was pleased.

Now it was time to swim.

I knew I had not done enough neurofeedback to permanently alter my brain, but I had tried it three or four times and expected to experience some change—a quieter mind, at least. Ever since I endured my overuse injury several years ago, I have spent much of my time in the pool worrying about aggravating the hurt shoulder.

I lowered myself in. Without a computer monitor to guide me, the effort to keep my mind quiet was a bit challenging. I tried to copy the way Katy had seemed to empty out her brain. I had noticed this emptying with other athletes too—how, say, the hours on the exercise bike just seemed to drip off them—and had always associated it with a lack of, well, intelligence. But now I understood it to be, in fact, an asset that one could acquire. As I warmed up by swimming the crawl, moving back and forth through the water, I felt a familiar light joyousness in my body. Whenever the thought of my shoulder came up, I envisioned instead speeding waves of alpha carrying me along. I swam faster, enjoying the liberating mindlessness of it. I imagined that from above I looked quite sleek—and then banished the thought. My flower was opening in a pageant of pink, yellow, and green.

I had planned to swim for maybe half an hour, and at about lap 20 something occurred. I was no longer alone in the water. A dolphin was leading me. No, seriously. It seemed weirdly logical—his body undulating like a brain wave. I followed my imaginary mammalian companion with pleasure. He was so fast that he lapped me every 20 or so seconds, but I trailed in his wake, arching and turning and flipping in my mind as I churned in the pool. Every so often, I would hear in my head a distinct ding—the positive audio reinforcement that rewards open concentration during neurofeedback sessions. Had my mind achieved that ideal state of pausitude, or was I somehow just mistaking having an unruly mind for having a quiet mind? But neurofeedback requires a suspension of doubt: No more chatterbox brain!

After my half hour was up, I got out of the water. The dolphin was gone. I looked at my watch. I had broken my previous best and my shoulder hurt like hell...."

Sep. 1st, 2010

NEUROFEEDBACK - w leczeniu Autyzmu





Szanowni Państwo,

Proponuję obejrzenie zamieszczonego poniżej, interesującego filmu


Z Szacunkiem

Dariusz Wyspiański


 

NEUROPLASTYCZNOŚĆ MÓZGU POD WPŁYWEM NEUROTERAPII - kolejny dowód naukowy


 

Szanowni Państwo,

"European Journal of Neuroscience" z marca 2010 prezentuje artykuł przedstawiający badania prowadzone naukowców z UNIVERSITY OF LONDON potwierdzające iż zaistniałe neuroplastyczne zmiany w strukturze kory mózgu, są wprost konsekwencją neuroterapii. Ma to istotne znaczenie z perspektywy klinicznej aplikacji tej metody.

Z Szacunkiem

Dariusz Wyspiański


Fragment artykułu :

Researchers from Goldsmiths and the Institute of Neurology (University of London) have demonstrated that half an hour of voluntary control of brain rhythms is sufficient to induce a lasting shift in cortical excitability and intracortical function. Remarkably, these after-effects are comparable in magnitude to those observed following interventions with artificial forms of brain stimulation involving magnetic or electrical pulses.

The novel finding may have important implications for future non-pharmacological therapies of the brain and calls for a serious re-examination and stronger backing of research on neurofeedback, a technique which may be promising tool to modulate cerebral plasticity in a safe, painless, and natural way.



“Endogenous control of waking brain rhythms induces neuroplasticity in humans”
Tomas Ros, et al., European Journal of Neuroscience, February 2010


Aug. 17th, 2010

Terapia RSA BIOFEEDBACK w leczeniu zaburzeń nerwicowych


 


Terapia RSA BIOFEEDBACK w leczeniu zaburzeń nerwicowych


„Journal of Applied Psychophisiology and Biofeedback” z roku 2006, przedstawia uzasadnione naukowo dowody (artykuł autorstwa Roberta Reinera) wskazujące na efektywność terapii RSA BIOFEEDBACKU (Respiratory Sinus Arrhythmia) w leczeniu pacjentów z zaburzeniami nerwicowymi objawiającymi się stanami lękowymi (min. mierzonymi skalą STAI) oraz zaburzeniami snu. Populacja badanych (24 os.) poddawana była różnym rodzajom oddziaływań terapeutycznych zorientowanych na redukcje stanów lękowych ( w tym oddechowe techniki relaksacyjne, yoga, itp.). Najlepszy efekt uzyskano stosując terapię RSA BIOFEEDBACKU. W przypadku 55% badanych, uzyskano poprawę snu, oraz obniżenie poziomu lęku (mierzonego także za pomocą narzędzi psychometrycznych, w tym wspomnianego wcześniej - STAI).

Niewielka populacja badanych, nie uprawnia do formułowania daleko idących wniosków, stanowi jednak argument w dyskusji wskazującej na szeroką terapeutyczną użyteczność zastosowanej metody Biofeedbacku.

Z Szacunkiem

Dariusz Wyspiański



Aug. 4th, 2010

BIOFEEDBACK - Theory & clinical activity/Teoria & zastosowania kliniczne


 

Szanowni Państwo,

Niniejszym zamieszczam kolejny artykuł prezentujący szeroki kontekst klinicznych aplikacji Neuroterapii.
Artykuł pochodzi ze strony "NeuroTherapy Centers For Health".

Zachęcam do lektury.

Dariusz Wyspiańsk
i



Overview:

Biofeedback is a training technique in which people are taught to improve their health and performance by using signals from their own bodies. Biofeedback is a means for gaining control of our body processes to increase relaxation, relieve pain, and develop healthier, more comfortable life patterns.


Description:

The word "biofeedback" was coined in late 1969 to describe lab procedures (developed in the 1940's) that trained research subjects to alter brain activity, blood pressure, muscle tension, heart rate and other bodily functions that are not normally controlled voluntarily. Biofeedback gives us information about ourselves by means of external instruments. Using a thermometer to take our temperature is a common kind of biofeedback. Biofeedback lets us know when we are changing our physiologies in the desired direction. It is not really a treatment. Rather, biofeedback training is an educational process for learning specialized mind/body skills which enables us to exert more control over the body's physiological processes. In biofeedback therapy, subjects are "fed back" information with reinforcing properties about their neuromuscular and autonomic activity, both normal and abnormal, in the form of analog or binary, auditory and/or visual feedback signals. Biofeedback therapy is a holistic therapy that emphasizes the wholeness of the human organism; changes within one system create changes in all other systems, to greater or lesser degrees. Instrumented biofeedback was pioneered by O. Hobart Mowrer in 1938, when he used an alarm system triggered by urine to stop bedwetting in children. But it was not until the late 1960's, when Barbara Brown, Ph.D., at the Veterans Administration Hospital in Sepulveda, California, and Elmer Green, Ph.D., and Alyce Green of the Menninger Foundation in Topeka, Kansas used EEG biofeedback to observe and record the altered states/self-regulation of yogis, that biofeedback began to attract widespread attention).


Method:

Clinical biofeedback follows the principle of using specialized instruments to monitor various physiological processes as they occur. Moving graphs in a computer screen and audio tones that go up and down reflect changes as they occur in the body system being measured. Many physiological processes can be monitored for biofeedback applications. Some of the more common ones are the following:


Temperature
Measured by sensors placed on the ring fingers.


EMG (electromyograph)
Measures muscle activity by detecting the electrical activity occuring with certain muscles, typically the trapezius (shoulder) muscles.



EDA (electrodermal activity)

Measured by determining either BSR (basal skin response) or GSR (galvanic skin response).


Heart Rate
Measured in beats per minute. Faster heart rates are often caused by stress. The inside wrists of a subject are cleaned and three silver sensors with conductice gel are slipped under elastic wrist bands to measure a person's heart rate.


Respiration

Measured in breaths per minute, typically by a strain gauge worn around the chest.


EEG

Brain waves are measured by the electroencephalograph (EEG). The EEG is comprised of several bandwidths: Theta (4-7 Hz.), Alpha (8-12 Hz.), Beta (13-20 Hz.), Gamma (21+ Hz.).

One commonly used device in biofeedback therapy picks up electrical signals from the muscles and translates the signals into a form that people can detect. This device triggers a flashing light or activates a beeper every time muscles become more tense. If one wants to relax tense muscles, one must try to slow down the flashing or beeping. Patients are taught to associate sensations from the muscle with actual levels of tension and develop a new, healthy habit of keeping muscles only as tense as is necessary for as long as necessary. After treatment, individuals are then able to repeat this response at will without being attached to the sensors.

Biofeedback machines can detect a person's internal bodily functions with far greater sensitivity and precision than a person can alone. Both patients and therapists use the information they gather from these machines to gauge and direct the progress of treatment. EEG biofeedback (neurofeedback) is utilized in the treatment of ADD/ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder).


Common cures:

Biofeedback research has shown that individuals can learn to control brainwave activity, cardiovascular and respiratory functioning, reduce skin temperature, and voluntarily modify many autonomic processes.

1. OSTEOLOGY

Neck and low back pains
Whiplash
Muscle tension
Jaw pain and dysfunction
2. JOINTS

Temporomandibular joint syndrome (TMJ)
4. VASCULAR

High Blood Pressure
Cardiac arrhythmias (abnormalities in the rhythm of the heartbeat)
5. NERVOUS SYSTEM

Bruxism (teeth grinding, often at night)
Tension headaches
Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder
Migraine headaches
Epilepsy Paralysis -Spinal cord injury and musculoskelelal disorders
Mental disorders
Phobias
Panic & Anxiety disorders
Mood disorder
Mild depression

7. DIGESTIVE SYSTEM



Acute and chronic pain of the digestive system
Fecal incontinence
8. RESPIRATORY SYSTEM

asthma
9. URINARY SYSTEM

Bedwetting
nocturnal enuresis
Leaky bladder
Urinary incontinence (a condition affecting up to 30 percent of elderly people living independently)
10. REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS


premenstrual syndrome
menorrhagia (excessive menstruation) (red raspberry, herbs manjistha and shatavari can treat it)
menstrual disorders
herpes (herbal mixture of shatavari, guwel sattva, kamadudha, and neem is recommended; tikta ghee can also treat herpes)
sexual dysfunction
PMS
12. IMMUNE SYSTEM

tonsillitis


Application:

Studies have shown that we have more control over so-called involuntary bodily functions than we once thought possible. As a result, biofeedback can offer individuals techniques for living a healthier life overall - whether one is afflicted with a medical condition or not. Biofeedback will not work as efficiently as possible in helping individuals attain this goal without the use use of one or more other alternative modalities simultaneously. These include meditation, deep relaxation techniques, breath control, yoga, and mind/body medicine among others.

Modern medicine's perspective:

Although most people initially viewed biofeedback practices with skepticism, researchers proved that many individuals could alter their involuntary responses by being "fed back" information either visually or audibley about what was occurring in their bodies. Through clinical research and application, biofeedback techniques have expanded into widely used procedures that treat an ever-lengthening list of conditions (See Common Cures).




Case Studies:


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
#1: Nine sessions of biofeedback were given to patients suffering from primary fibromyalgia over a period of four weeks. Pre- and post- treatment baseline level measurements were taken from the trapezius muscles as well as a measure of muscle sensitivity. Cognitive variables helplessness and belief of control) were also obtained. The analysis showed a significant reduction in general intensity of pain and in EMG activity as well as a significant increase in muscular sensitivity. Further analyses show the increases in muscular sensitivity to be correlated with the decrease of EMG activity in the trapezius baseline. Self-reported pain reduction was predicted by a change in cognitive variables.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

#2: 60 patients with hemiplegia after acute stroke or traumatic brain injury were seen for balance training. After a training period of four weeks, the results of this study indicated that a new standing biofeedback device that had been developed had a positive training effect on stance symmetry in hemiplegic subjects. The device includes a heigh-adjustable work table, weight sensors, plus a real-time visual and auditory feedback system.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

#3: Melvyn Werbach, M.D., was approached by a woman whose husband had been in a coma for several months. Dr. Werbach and an associate arranged to hook the man up to various biofeedback devices in an attempt to communicate with him. While Dr. Werbach monitored the biofeedback equipment, his associate asked the comatose patient to concentrate on specific areas of the body. To everyone's surprise, the galvanic skin response monitor began to move with the request. Although he was in a coma, the patient was able to hear. At the end of the session, the family and staff were shocked to hear him moan loudly. The patient came out of his coma within a month of this initial session.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------




Jul. 2nd, 2010

"BIOFEEDBACK MAGAZINE" - polska edycja już wkrótce !


 

Szanowni Państwo,

Z ogromną przyjemnością informuję, iż zbliza się moment inicjacji polskiej edycji prestiżowego "BIOFEEDBACK MAGAZINE"

Pozwalam sobie przedstawić treść maila, jaki otrzymałem od Pana Dr RAFAŁA SZTEMBISA, zawierający bliższe szczegóły działan jakie zostały już podjęte.

Z Szacunkiem

Dariusz Wyspiański



"Szanowni Państwo,

jest nam bardzo miło poinformować Państwa, iż dzięki naszym staraniom inspirowanym m.in. przez rozmowy z Państwem, już jesienią br. roku dostępna będzie polskojęzyczna wersja prestiżowego czasopisma "Biofeedback Magazine" wydawanego przez American Association of Psychophysiology and Biofeedack (AAPB). Każdy numer tego kwartalnika to 50 stron informacji o doświadczeniach wiodących w świecie ośrodków klinicznych w praktycznym zastosowaniu biofeedbacku i neurofeedbacku w psychologii, medycynie i poza nimi, które nie tylko wyznaczają trendy w badaniach naukowych, ale redagowanych przez AAPB zaleceniach.
Poza regularnym przygotowywaniem tego kwartalnika zaproponujemy również na początku 2011 roku zbiorcze zestawienie najciekawszych artykułów obejmujących rok 2009 oraz pierwsze dwa numery z 2010 roku.
Planowana cena jednego ezgzemplarza to 29 zł plus koszt wysyłki (płatne przy odbiorze; faktura).
Jeśli jesteście Państwo zainteresowani otrzymywaniem tego periodyku uprzejmie prosimy o odpowiedź na ten mail zawierającą imię i nazwisko vel nazwę instytucji, adres korespondencyjny i dane do wystawienia faktury VAT (NIP).

W imieniu zespołu redakcyjnego polskiej wersji
Rafał Sztembis

Zespół redakcyjny polskiej wersji Biofeedback Magazine
prof. dr hab. dr h.c. Kazimierz Popielski
dr n. hum. Lilia Suchocka
dr n.hum., lekarz Rafał Sztembis"





Jun. 29th, 2010

Oni stosują BIOFEEDBACK - Piłkarze AC MILAN


 

Szanowni Państwo,

Afrykański MUNDIAL wchodzi właśnie w decydującą fazę. Podziwiając wyczyny piłkarskich wirtuzów, warto zastanowić się nad źródłami ich perfekcji i tajemnicami przygotowań, które ostatecznie decydują o jakości gry w najważniejszym turnieju, turnieju, którego triumfatorzy przechodzą do historii światowego sportu ....

Chciałbym zacytować fragment artykułu pochodzącego z wortalu : http://ciekawostki.com.pl/, przedstawiającego kulisy przygotowań do sezonu w Serie A (I lidze włoskiej) oraz występów w Lidze Mistrzów, piłkarzy jednego z najsłynniejszych europejskich klubów - włoskiego AC MILAN.

Artykuł opisuje sytuację sprzed kilku lat, jednak metody wówczas wypracowane i sprawdzone nadal zajmują ważne miejsce w "arsenale" narzędzi budowy formy graczy mediolańskiego klubu.
"BIOFEEDBACK" jest - jak nietrudno się domyślić - jednym z elementów owego arsenału.

Zachęcam do lektury artykułu nie tylko fanów footballu.....

Z Szacunkiem

Dariusz Wyspiański




"W tajnym laboratorium piłkarskim


Profile wellnessu, biofeedback, posiedzenia w Mind Room - AC Milan ma najnowocześniejszą w Europie sekcję medyczną. W Milan Lab trenuje się nie tylko mięśnie, lecz także duszę.

Pierwszy trener nowego wieku wierci się niespokojnie na ławce w szatni. Sezon był dotąd wystarczająco trudny i Carlo Ancelotti nie chce akurat teraz budzić wrażenia, że to nie jego praca i intuicja spowodowały, iż AC Milan jest faworytem w ćwierćfinałowych meczach Ligi Mistrzów z Bayern Monachium, lecz zrobił to jakiś komputer w piwnicy, który mierzy prądy mózgowe jego graczy. Z całym szacunkiem, daje do zrozumienia Ancelotti, ale akurat tego tematu to on nie lubi.

Ale Ancelotti wie oczywiście, że w międzynarodowym futbolu rozchodzi się wieść o Milan Lab, niczym wśród wojskowych wiadomość o lokalizacji tajnych laboratoriów badawczych. Nikt tam nie był, ale wszyscy o tym mówią. To w pełni skomputeryzowane laboratorium zdolne jest do niesłychanych rzeczy: potrafi zmniejszyć liczbę kontuzji, zwiększyć wydajność graczy i przedłużyć ich karierę. "L'Equipe" nazywa je "nową tajną bronią" - tak jakby klub miał jeszcze w zanadrzu szybkiego jak strzała napastnika, nieznanego nikomu.

- Ancelotti jest pierwszym trenerem piłkarskim, którego praca opiera się na naukowych danych - mówi Jean-Pierre Meersseman. To zdanie jest może nieco na wyrost. Szefa Milan Lab otacza nieco zagadkowa aura, potrafi on zafascynować słuchaczy. Ten chiropraktyk zajmował się zawsze bogatymi i potężnymi, rozruszał stawy m.in. handlarzowi broni Adnanowi Kashoggiemu i byłemu premierowi Silvio Berlusconiemu. I to właśnie Berlusconi, prezes AC Milan, ściągnął Meerssemana do Milanello.

Tereny treningowe klubu, 50 kilometrów na północny-zachód od Mediolanu, położone są między piniowymi lasami a małym sztucznym jeziorem. Widać stąd Alpy. Milanello promienieje staromodnym wdziękiem rześkiego letniego dnia, żwirek na drodze trzeszczy pod butami jak w czasie spaceru w wiejskiej posiadłości w Anglii. To tutaj Meersseman wraz z dwoma kolegami zbudował Milan Lab, system, który ostrzega trenera przed kontuzjami jego graczy, tak jak komputer pokładowy w limuzynie informuje o spadku ciśnienia oleju lub zużyciu okładzin tarcz hamulcowych.

Meersseman rozwinął swój pomysł razem z psychologiem sportu Bruno Demichelisem i trenerem fitnessu Daniele Tognaccinim, który w swojej pracy magisterskiej zajmował się "wykorzystaniem komputerów w nowoczesnym programie treningowym". Było to w roku 2001. Rok wcześniej AC Milan kupił od Realu Madryt za 18 milionów euro reprezentanta Argentyny Fernando Redondo i dał mu najwyższy w światowym futbolu kontrakt. Jednakże Redondo podczas treningu od razu odniósł ciężką kontuzję, która wykluczyła go z gry na dwa lata. Gdyby udało się zapobiec takiemu przypadkowi, Milan Lab pomógłby zaoszczędzić miliony.

W lipcu 2002 roku zaczęli zbierać w Milanello wszelkie możliwe dane graczy.

- Na początku można było niemal oszaleć, bo nie wiadomo było, które są ważne - mówi Bruno Demichelis. Jako dziecko marzył, by zostać samurajem, nauczył się japońskiego i w 1977 roku zajął drugie miejsce na mistrzostwach świata w karate w Tokio. Teraz ma 60 lat i obwieszcza, grzmiąc niczym wędrowny kaznodzieja, "systematyczny udział" w budowaniu drużyny. Takie myślenie, zapewnia, jest "jak przejście na system kopernikański".

To kolejne odważne zdanie, ale Demichelis jest przekonany, że trzeba uwzględniać wszystko, co może wpływać na formę czołowego gracza. Także to, co je on na śniadanie, jakie buty nosi na treningu i czy akurat pada deszcz. W Milan Lab zbiera się dane o budowie kostnej, mięśniach i nerwach. Za pomocą testów osobowościowych mierzona jest umysłowa sprawność graczy, podobno testy z pytaniami są w 27 językach. Wszystkie wyniki opracowuje komputer, każdy gracz otrzymuje tzw. profil wellnesu, a jeśli zjedzie o ponad 30 procent poniżej swojego najlepszego wyniku, wycofywany jest z treningu.

- Na emocje jest czas w ciągu 90 minut meczu, poza boiskiem wolimy trzymać się faktów - mówi Meersseman.

Zanim Milan Lab rozpoczął pracę, Milan przez siedem lat nie osiągnął na wielkiej scenie Ligi Mistrzów nawet ćwierćfinału. A teraz, w pierwszym roku funkcjonowania laboratorium, wygrał już Ligę Mistrzów, pokonując w finale akurat Juventus Turyn, wielkiego rywala z własnego kraju. A więc Milan Lab przynajmniej nie szkodził.

Ale co się tam właściwie dzieje? Na razie ludzie w Milanello chowają się za kaskadą ładnie brzmiących słów. - Trochę się tym bawimy - wyjaśnił jeden z działaczy klubu angielskiej gazecie "The Guardian". - Ujawniamy nieco informacji, co budzi ciekawość, ale zachowujemy tajemnicę, co budzi jeszcze większą ciekawość. Brzmi to, jakby prowadzili wyrafinowaną kampanię PR na rzecz laboratorium, które nie ma nawet własnego logo.

Ale piłkarzy nie da się przekonać robieniem tajemnic. Gracz reprezentacji Danii Thomas Helveg miał kontrakt z Milanem w pierwszym roku funkcjonowania laboratorium. Mówi, że żaden piłkarz nie powiedział ani jednego złego słowa na ten temat. Jeszcze dzisiaj w głosie Helvega brzmi euforia, gdy mówi o swoich doświadczeniach. Było mniej kontuzjowanych - według danych klubu liczba nietraumatycznych kontuzji spadła o 90 proc. - a każdy piłkarz był coraz lepszy. Helveg poprawił wyskok, co ma spore znaczenie dla obrońcy.

Milan Lab funkcjonuje także jako studnia młodości. Czterdziestoletni Alessandro Costacurta, występując w listopadzie w meczu z AEK Ateny, stał się najstarszym graczem w historii Ligi Mistrzów. Brazylijczyk Cafu, 36 lat, i właśnie kontuzjowany Paolo Maldini, 38 lat, ciągle jeszcze są podstawowymi graczami. Pod względem średniej wieku AC Milan jest najstarszą wśród wybitnych drużyn w Europie.

Klub zatrudnia nie tylko diagnostyków formy, lekarzy sportowych i masażystów. Osteopata usuwa blokady w ciele. Kuchnia w Milanello używa tylko biodynamicznych produktów, co jeżdżący BMW Demichelis komentuje następująco: - Samochodu wyścigowego nie tankuje się przecież na zwykłej stacji benzynowej.

Mimo to w czerwcu 2005 roku AC Milan przeżył jedną z największych porażek w swojej historii. Drużyna przegrała w finale Ligi Mistrzów w rzutach karnych z Liverpoolem, choć do przerwy prowadziła już 3:0. Była to także porażka psychologów. - Po meczu powiedziałem: albo mnie wyrzućcie, albo wreszcie będę mógł zbudować Mind Room - mówi Demichelis.

Do znajdującego się w piwnicy Mind Room prowadzą schody obok pomieszczenia do fitnessu. Każdy, kto chce wejść, musi przycisnąć kciuk do biometrycznego sensora. Za drzwiami, w centralnym komputerze zbiegają się wszystkie dane Milan Lab, nieco dalej brane są pomiary piłkarzy i robi się im testy ruchowe. Jest tu mnóstwo techniki, ale ani odrobiny światła dziennego. Podobnie w Mind Room. Jest dźwiękoszczelny, temperatura i wilgotność powietrza są zawsze takie same. Tutaj na dole Lab sprawia rzeczywiście wrażenie tajnego laboratorium. U góry, w pomieszczeniu fitnessu trenuje się ciało, w piwnicy - duszę.

To, co dzieje się na dole, wychodzi daleko poza testy osobowościowe, jakie zwykle robi Demichelis, czy poza jego ćwiczenia mające poprawić zdolność postrzegania. - Tutaj prowadzimy mentalną gimnastykę - mówi psycholog. W tym celu okablowuje się zawodowców na sześciu żółtych leżankach. Demichelis na monitorach w pomieszczeniu kontrolnym widzi, jak bije ich serce, jaki mają oddech, temperaturę skóry, zaś częstotliwość fal mózgowych pokazuje stopień koncentracji piłkarzy. Zdolność koncentracji trenuje się w ten sposób, że piłkarze muszą skupić się na animowanej postaci, by utrzymać ją w ruchu. Jeśli odbiegną gdzieś myślami, zmieniają się fale mózgowe i figura zastyga w miejscu. Niektórzy piłkarze mają już za sobą ponad sto takich posiedzeń.

Biofeedback to metoda, którą stosowano wcześniej jedynie w leczeniu klinicznym, na przykład w terapii dzieci z zaburzeniami uwagi. Obecnie sięgają po nią nawet czołowi sportowcy, jak mistrz olimpijski w narciarstwie Hermann Maier czy kierowca Formuły I Ralf Schumacher. - Te ćwiczenia skończyły z wieloma bezsensownymi cierpieniami - mówi Demichelis - gdy sportowcy często tylko z powodu słabej koncentracji lub blokady psychicznej nie mogli osiągnąć najlepszych wyników.

Biofeedback, mentalna gimnastyka i redukcja ryzyka kontuzji - to wszystko brzmi bardzo pięknie, ale czasami także nieco ezoterycznie. - Gdzie jest dowód? - pyta Tim Meyer, lekarz niemieckiej reprezentacji piłkarskiej. Na kilku kongresach widział prezentacje ludzi z Milan Lab. - Za niepoważne uważam zapewnienia, że kilka godzin po posiłku można sprawdzić na podstawie badania krwi, czy jedzenie było odpowiednie - mówi Meyer. Jest także zdania, że niemal każdy rodzaj zwiększonej opieki nad piłkarzami może mieć pozytywne działanie. - Wystarczy zrobić cokolwiek, a już osiąga się krótkoterminowe korzystne efekty - zapewnia.

Czy więc w Milanello po prostu strzelali śrutem i trafili, bo opieka nad graczami stała się bardziej intensywna? - Uważam, że mamy do czynienia z czymś fantastycznym - zapewnia Jean Pierre Meersseman. Przyznaje jednak, że na razie nie potrafi tego udowodnić. - Zakończyliśmy właśnie pierwszą fazę rozwoju i musimy jeszcze zebrać dokładne dane naukowe.

Trzeba także zająć się załamaniem w tym sezonie, który jest dla AC Milan jednym z najtrudniejszych. Klub uwikłany był w skandal korupcyjny, dlatego spadł w tabeli i na początku sezonu musiał grać w kwalifikacjach do Ligii Mistrzów. Piłkarze, którzy uczestniczyli w mistrzostwach świata, nie mieli praktycznie urlopu, chociaż obliczenia Milan Lab przewidywały cztery tygodnie odpoczynku. Gdy pod koniec ubiegłego roku w ciągu kilku tygodni kontuzje odniosło tylu graczy, co w ciągu pięciu poprzednich lat, w klubie doszło do gwałtownych dyskusji na temat Milan Lab. Ale Meersseman powiedział, że wszystkie kontuzje były wypadkami, a awarię komputera pokładowego tłumaczył "nerwowymi przygotowaniami do sezonu".

Od stycznia w AC Milan uważają, że najgorsze mają już za sobą. W następnym sezonie dane z treningu mają być analizowane w czasie rzeczywistym, dzięki wsparciu ze strony Instytutu Biotechniki Uniwersytetu w Liege. Ponadto Massachusetts Institute of Technology tworzy dla mediolańczyków system analizy gry.

Trener Carlo Ancelotti wolałby jednak przypomnieć, jak ważne są dla niego, mimo istnienia Milan Lab, "emocje i intuicja". - Poza tym to ciągle jeszcze ja prowadzę samochód - mówi Ancelotti. Komputer pokładowy póki co nie przejął kierownicy...."

Najsłynniejsi piłkarze MILANU:

Ronaldinho (Brazylia)
 

David Beckham (Anglia)
 

Clarence Seedorf (Holandia)




BIOFEEDBACK - skuteczne narzędzie redukujące tremę muzyków



Szanowni Państwo,

Prezentuję ciekawy artykuł z magazynu  LOS ANGELES TIMES odwołujący się do kolejnych badań dotyczących muzyków. Tym razem terapia BIOFEEDBACK zorientowana jest na redukcję poziomu lęku (lęku jako stanu) i odnosi się do wsparcia muzyków w procesie zwalczania często paraliżującej tremy.

Zachęcam do lektury

Z Szacunkiem

Dariusz Wyspiański

 

Biofeedback technique eases musicians' anxiety

 

Music If you've ever sat down at the piano to play a Mozart sonata and couldn't find middle C, you know the feeling of performance anxiety. The condition, often called stage fright, is anxiety that is so severe it can impede performance. As many as three-quarters of musicians have musical performance anxiety. Thus, for serious students, learning to master this condition may be as important as learning all the scales.

A new study shows that a specific biofeedback technique is highly effective in decreasing stage fright. Researchers studied 14 college-age musicians. The musicians' tendency to have stage fright was estimated in a performance before an audience at the start of the study (with questionnaires and heart rate measurements). Half of the musicians repeated the performance four weeks later. The other half received training in biofeedback that was designed to teach them how to control their heart rate through thoughts and emotions. These students also performed again after four weeks.
The study showed a 71% decrease in performance anxiety in the biofeedback group compared with the control group. The biofeedback group had a 62% improvement in performance. The musicians in the biofeedback group also said they had an overall increased sense of calmness, slept better, were more relaxed and had less anger in their everyday lives.
Biofeedback helps coordinate the brain-heart-body processes, the authors wrote. This synchronicity defeats performance anxiety and gives musicians a feeling of "flow," the authors said, which they defined as "when a person is functioning at peak capacity, including mind, body and energy."
The study appears in the current issue of Biofeedback, published by the Assn. for Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback.
-- Shari Roan...'

Jun. 8th, 2010

NEUROFEEDBACK - droga rozwoju talentu muzycznego



 

Szanowni Państwo,

Pozwalam sobie na zaprezentowanie niezwykle interesujących doniesień z badań dotyczących wykorzystania EEG BIOFEEDBACKU (Neurofeedbacku) do podwyższania jakości wykonania artystycznego utworów muzycznych.
Informacje pochodzą z materiałow "Biofeedback Society, California, USA zaś same badania zostały przeprowadzone przez naukowców z "Imperial College London"

Z Szacunkiem

Dariusz Wyspiański



"Music Performance up 17%with Neurofeedback

- Biofeedback Society of California29th Annual Conference, November 6-9, 2003See pages 13


Researchers from Imperial College London and
Charing Cross Hospital have discovered a way to
help musicians improve their musical performanc-
es by an average of up to 17 per cent, equivalent to
an improvement of one grade or class of honours.
The research published in this months edition of
Neuroreport, shows that using a process known
as neurofeedback, students at London’s Royal
College of Music were able to improve their per-
formance across a number of areas including their
musical understanding and imagination, and their
communication with the audience.

Dr. Tobias Egner, from Imperial College London
at Charing Cross Hospital, one of the authors of
the study, comments: “This is a unique use of
neurofeedback. It has been used for helping with a
number of conditions such as attention deficit dis-
order and epilepsy, but this is the first time it has
been used to improve a complex set of skills such
as musical performance in healthy students.”
Professor John Gruzelier, from Imperial College
London at Charing Cross Hospital, and senior
author of the study, adds: “These results show
that neurofeedback can have a marked effect on
musical performance. The alpha/theta training
protocol has found promising applications as a
complementary therapeutic tool in post-traumatic
stress disorder and alcoholism. While it has a role
in stress reduction by reducing the level of stage
fright, the magnitude and range of beneficial ef-
fects on artistic aspects of performance have wider
implications than alleviating stress..."




Jun. 1st, 2010

BIOFEEDBACK - "Leczenie lęków i depresji"




Szanowni Państwo,

Załączam fragment znakomitej książki autorstwa amerykańskich terapeutów LISY C. ROUTH i DANIELA G. AMENA pt.: "LECZENIE LĘKÓW I DEPRESJI".
Zacytowany fragment dotyczy BIOFEEDBACKU jako metody wspomagającej proces psychoterapii.

Z Szacunkiem

Dariusz Wyspiański



LISA C. ROUTH i DANIEL G. AMEN - "Leczenie lęków i depresji"

"Ośmioletnia Brenna cierpiała z powodu przesadnej nieśmiałości oraz silnego lęku. Chowała się za matką, gdy przedstawiano ją obcym, rzadko wypowiadała się na forum klasy, jadła lunch sama i często skarżyła się na bóle brzucha i głowy. Jej ojciec miał podobne problemy w dzieciństwie, a w wieku dorosłym zdiagnozowano u niego zespół lęku uogólnionego. Po dokładnym badaniu, przeprowadzonym w naszej klinice, u Brenny stwierdzono typ pierwszy zaburzeń, czystą postać lęku. W ramach leczenia podłączyliśmy ją do skomplikowanej aparatury wykorzystywanej przy biofeedbacku. Dokonywaliśmy pomiaru temperatury jej dłoni, tętna, wzorców oddechowych, aktywności gruczołów potowych dłoni oraz napięcia mięśniowego. Wszystkie te układy fizjologiczne były przeciążone. Wyglądało to tak, jak gdyby Brenna żyła w ciągłym strachu, cały czas gotowa do reakcji typu „walcz lub uciekaj”. Brenna przez większość życia owładnięta była lękiem. Stosowaliśmy wesołe gry komputerowe, dzięki którym uczyła się zmieniać fizjologię swojego organizmu. Instruowaliśmy ją, jak rozgrzać dłonie, obniżyć tętno, spowolnić i pogłębić oddech, rozluźnić mięśnie. Po trzech miesiącach szkolenia w zakresie biofeedbacku Brenna zaczęła zdradzać objawy odprężenia. Fizyczne objawy stresu(bóle głowy i brzucha) złagodniały. Mogła już udzielać się na lekcjach i stała się bardziej towarzyska. Czuła się również swobodniej.

Biofeedback zasadza się na bardzo prostym założeniu. Jeśli otrzymamy informację zwrotną na temat jakiegoś procesu fizjologicznego zachodzącego w organizmie, takiego jak oddychanie, czynność wydzielnicza gruczołów potowych, tętno, napięcie mięśniowe lub schematy fal mózgowych, możemy nauczyć się go kontrolować. Biofeedback jest porównywany do spoglądania w lustro po przebudzeniu. Parzą w lustro, zmieniamy swój wygląd w taki sposób, aby był on bardziej atrakcyjny. Lustro przekazuje nam informację zwrotną o naszym wyglądzie, a my wykorzystujemy ją do skorygowania go. Biofeedback oraz autoregulacja od końca lat sześćdziesiątych XX w. stanowią elementy psychoterapii. Dzięki rozwojowi technologii pod koniec lat osiemdziesiątych aparatura komputerowa stała się niezmiernie pomocna w procesie regulowania fizjologii organizmu. Ale, niestety, jest ona wykorzystywana w niewielkim stopniu. Koncepcja techniki biofeedbacku stała się ważnym punktem w rozważaniach doktora Amena nad różnymi zaburzeniami lękowymi i depresyjnymi.

Doktor Amen: Po ukończeniu szkolenia psychiatrycznego w Walter Reed Amy Medical Center w Waszyngtonie oraz Triplet Army Medical Center w Honolulu na Hawajach stacjonowałem w Fort Irwin – czterdzieści mil na północ od Barstow w zachodniej części kalifornijskiej pustyni Mojave. Znajdująca się w połowie drogi pomiędzy Los Angeles I las Vegas baza wojskowa Fort Irwin znana była również pod nazwą National Training Center. To tutaj amerykańscy żołnierze uczyli się, jak walczyć z Rosjanami(a później Irakijczykami) w warunkach pustynnych. W tamtym czasie byłem jedynym psychiatrą na 4 tysiące żołnierzy i drugie 4 tysiące członków ich rodzin. To było dla nas wszystkich miejsce odosobnienia. W Fort Irwin występowały problemy z przemocą domową, uzależnieniem od narkotyków(zwłaszcza amfetaminy), depresją oraz innymi dolegliwościami wynikającymi ze stresu życia na pustkowiu. Zajmowałem się wieloma osobami cierpiącymi na bóle głowy, napady lęku, bezsenność oraz nadmierne napięcie mięśniowe. Krótko po przyjeździe do bazy Fort Irwin zrobiłem inspekcję szafek miejscowej kliniki psychiatrii, aby zobaczyć, jakie przyrządy oraz testy psychologiczne pozostawili po sobie moi poprzednicy. Ku mojej radości znalazłem tam stary aparat do biofeedbacku, który mierzył temperaturę dłoni. Chociaż miałem za sobą tylko jeden wykład na temat techniki biofeedbacku, zamysł autoregulacji fascynował mnie. Problem stanowiła tu nuda. Igły i pokrętła nie były niczym ciekawym dla pacjentów. Pomimo to stosowaliśmy ten stary aparat u osób z migrenowymi bólami głowy. Uczyłem je, jak rozgrzewać dłonie wyłącznie za pomocą wyobraźni, co pomaga w migrenie, ponieważ zwiększa reakcję odprężeniową organizmu, przeciwdziałając stresowi często związanemu z bólami głowy. Możność obserwowania pacjentów rzeczywiście zwiększających temperaturę swoich dłoni, czasem aż o piętnaście do dwudziestu stopni(Fahrenheita), była fascynująca. Trening ten okazał się pomocny u wielu pacjentów. Umożliwiał im uczestnictwo we własnym procesie leczenia; nie musieli polegać tylko na lekach, które wyłącznie uśmierzają ból.
Sześć miesięcy po przybyciu do Fort Irwin napisałem do pułkownika Knowlesa, dowódcy naszego szpitala, prosząc o pozwolenie na zakup dla kliniki psychiatrycznej najnowszego sprzętu do biofeedbacku, wartego 30 tysięcy dolarów, oraz wysłanie mnie na dziesięciodniowe szklenie w San Francisco. Moja prośba go rozbawiła. Stwierdził, że armia nie posiada takich pieniędzy, a kiedy tylko skończy się moja służba w Fort Irwin, urządzenie zostanie zamknięte w jakiejś szafce, podobnie jak to, które znalazłem. Zarzuciłem ten pomysł, ale w dalszym ciagu wykorzystywałem stary aparat do pomiarów temperatury. Prawie rok później z zaskoczeniem przyjąłem zatwierdzenie mojego wniosku. Okazało się, że jeśli wojskowy oddział szpitalny nie wyda swojego rocznego budżetu, trafi nie wykorzystaną część pieniędzy. Dlatego środki te przeznaczono na nowy sprzęt i moje dziesięciodniowe szkolenie w San Francisco!
Kurs w Applied Psychopysological Institute(Instytut Psychofizjologii Stosowanej) zmienił moje życie. Było to najbardziej inspirujące i najgłębsze doświadczenie edukacyjne w moim życiu lekarza. Dziesięciogodzinne zajęcia każdego dnia przemknęły niczym błyskawica. Nowy skomputeryzowany sprzęt do biofeedbacku był przyjazdy pacjentowi, interesujący i łatwy do opanowania. Nauczyłem się, jak pomagać ludziom rozluźniać mięśnie, ogrzewać dłonie(o wiele szybciej niż na starym aparacie), uspokajać wzmożoną aktywność gruczołów potowych, obniżać ciśnienie tętnicze, zwalniać tętno oraz oddychać w sposób ułatwiający odprężenie.
Wykłady na temat techniki biofeedbacku fal mózgowych były najbardziej zdumiewające. Uczono mnie, że ludzie mogą faktycznie zmieniać swoje wzory fal mózgowych. Cóż to była za niezwykła idea, by modyfikować stan własnego umysłu! Poznałem również wyniki badań doktora Lubara, prowadzonych na University of Tennessee, w zakresie osłabionej aktywności fal mózgowych u dzieci cierpiących na ADD oraz badań innych lekarzy, którzy stosowali Biofeedback fal mózgowych w leczeniu depresji, lęku i uzależnień.
Kiedy wróciłem do Fort Irwin, próbowałem wszystkiego, czego się nauczyłem. Wykonywałem zabiegi biofeedbacku prawie u wszystkich pacjentów, którzy przychodzili na wizyty. Uwielbiałem to. Moi podopieczni również. Codziennie przeprowadzałem te ćwiczenia także na sobie. Stałem się mistrzem oddychania przeponowego. Mogłem spowalniać swoje tętno, rozgrzewać dłonie zawsze, gdy czułem się spięty. Zacząłem też badań dzieci z ADD, stosując technikę EEG. U wielu moich małych pacjentów obserwowałem te same schematy, o których pisał doktor Lubar. Wiele z tych dzieci odniosło korzyść treningu biofeedbacku.
Kiedy moje zobowiązania względem Armii Stanów Zjednoczonych wygasły, rozpocząłem prywatną praktykę w Fairfield w stanie Kalifornia. Kupiłem własny sprzęt do biofeedbacku i w dalszym ciągu wykorzystywałem go w praktyce klinicznej. Zostałem również dyrektorem oddziału podwójnych diagnoz(na którym przebywali pacjenci uzależnieni z problemami psychiatrycznymi) w miejscowym szpitalu psychiatrycznym i wprowadziłem stosowanie biofeedbacku w całym szpitalu. Do dziś korzystam z tej techniki.

Biofeedback ma swoje korzenie w przemyśleniach medycznych na temat stresu oraz reakcji walki lub ucieczki. Naukowcy od dziesięcioleci wiedzieli, że mózg posiada układ odpowiedzialny za wyciszenie organizmu(układ przywspółczulny) oraz układ aktywacji lub przygotowania do reakcji na konkretny stres czy strach(układ współczulny). W wypadku pobudzenia układ współczulny odpowiedzialny jest za reakcję walki lub ucieczki, pierwotny stan, który przygotowuje nas do reakcji w razie jawnego zagrożenia fizycznego(takiego jak spotkanie z rozjuszonym psem) oraz bardziej ukrytego, wewnętrznego, emocjonalnego(takiego jak zaburzenia poczucia własnej wartości lub obawa przed przyszłością). Serce zaczyna bić szybciej, mięśnie napinają się, dłonie wydzielają więcej potu, by ochłodzić organizm, częstotliwość oddechu oraz ciśnienie tętnicze wzrastają, dłonie i stopy stają się chłodniejsze, gdyż krew jest przetłaczana z kończyn do dużych mięśni(w celu przygotowania organizmu do walki lub ucieczki), a źrenice się rozszerzają(żeby osobnik lepiej widział). Taka reakcja na stres jest bardzo silna i natychmiastowa. Uraz psychiczny również rozpala ośrodki emocjonalne mózgu i przełącza organizm na wyższy poziom stresu, wywołując stałą gotowość do reakcji walki lub ucieczki.
Stosując sprzęt do techniki biofeedbacku, wykonaliśmy wiele testów stresu psychofizjologicznego. Obserwacja tego procesu jest fascynująca. Monitorujemy u pacjentów tętno, szybkość oddychania, temperaturę dłoni, aktywność gruczołów potowych dłoni oraz napięcie mięśniowe, a następnie poddajemy ich serii ćwiczeń, które pokazują, w jaki sposób ich ciało reaguje na stres. Czy zmienia się u nich wzorzec oddychania lub prędkość oddechu? Czy reagują oni poprzez wzmożenie napięcia mięśniowego oraz ochłodzenie dłoni? Czy można zaobserwować u nich większą aktywność gruczołów potowych? Takie informacje pomagają nam zrozumieć, w jaki sposób doświadczamy stresu i który z naszych układów fizjologicznych jest bardziej wrażliwy.
Oprócz testów stresu psychofizjologicznego przeprowadzamy też test kojarzenia słów, aby lepiej zrozumieć podatność psychiczną. Nieświadoma część umysłu porozumiewa się z nami, wykorzystując mechanizmy fizjologii ludzkiego ciała. opierając się na ważnych dla danej osoby pojęciach, opracowujemy listę dwudziestu słów i sprawdzamy, w jaki sposób jej organizm na nie reaguje. Na liście znajduje się kilka słów neutralnych, takich jak „filiżanka” czy „spinacz”, oraz słowa mające większe zabarwienie emocjonalne. Gdy na przykład powiemy „baseball” lub „pociąg”, w pomiarach fizjologicznych prawdopodobnie nie zaobserwujemy żadnych zmian. Jeśli jednak powiemy „matka”, często uzyskujemy silną reakcję. Jeśli „matka” jest konstruktem pozytywnym emocjonalnie, zaobserwujemy pozytywną zmianę procesów fizjologicznych – tętno oraz szybkość oddechu opadną, mięśnie się rozluźnią, a dłonie staną się cieplejsze i bardziej suche. Jeśli „matka” wiąże się z bolesnymi i stresującymi wspomnieniami, zauważymy zmianę negatywną – tętno oraz szybkość oddechu się zwiększą, mięśnie staną się bardziej napięte, dłonie się ochłodzą, a czynności gruczołów potowych wzrośnie.
Angus przyszedł do nas z powodu bezsenności oraz bólów głowy. Było oczywiste, że przepełnia go lęk, który – jak się wydawało – rozpoczął się w momencie, gdy w pracy – miejscowym biurze kredytów hipotecznych – przydzielono mu nowego kierownika. Powiedział nam, że jego szef jest władczy, negatywnie nastawiony oraz nieobliczalny. Jego reakcja na test kojarzenia słów była gwałtowana. Na wszystkie słowa z wyjątkiem jednego reagował normalnie. Natomiast słowo „kierownik” wywoływało w nim tak silną negatywną reakcję fizjologiczną, że zaczęliśmy się obawiać o jego zdrowie. Serce waliło mu niemiłosiernie, oddech się zatrzymywał, ręce stawały się lodowate i bardzo Mokrem, a napięcie mięśniowe sięgało zenitu. Gdyby Agnus nie musiał chodzić do tej pracy, zalecilibyśmy mu zwolnienie się. Odejście jednak nie było możliwe. Kiedy pokazaliśmy Agnusowi, jak jego organizm zareagował na słowo „kierownik”, zdecydował się popracować nad problemem szefa, tak by nie miał on już wpływu na jego zdrowie fizyczne i emocje. Stosując Biofeedback, nauczyliśmy go osiągnąć wysoki poziom odprężenia oraz olbrzymią kontrolę nad reakcjami organizmu na stres. Nauczyliśmy go techniki oddechu przeponowego oraz rozgrzewania dłoni i głębokiego rozluźniania mięśni. Oprócz tego, kiedy poznał już techniki samowyciszania, poddawaliśmy go próbie stresu za pomocą myśli o szefie i zmuszaliśmy go do wyobrażenia sobie negatywnych interakcji na płaszczyźnie zawodowej przy jednoczesnym zachowaniu spokoju. Nauczyliśmy go, jak skuteczniej radzić sobie z trudnymi ludźmi(takimi jak szef). Z biegiem czasu Angus czuł się w pracy coraz lepiej i z upodobaniem korzystał z umiejętności kontrolowania własnych procesów fizjologicznych, co uniezależniało go od nastrojów szefa...."




Przydatność Terapii Biofeedback w pracy z młodzieżą niedostosowaną społecznie.


 


Szanowni Państwo,

Pozwalam sobie zaprezentować obszerne fragmenty eseju autorstwa Pana Macieja Herwarta i Pana Tomasza Króla, pracujących w Młodzieżowym Ośrodku Wychowawczym i praktykujących BIOFEEDBACK ,w pracy terapeutycznej z upośledzoną młodzieżą.
Opinia autorów jest tym wartościowsza, iż została przedstawiona z perspektywy praktyków oceniających efektywność podejmowanych działań terapeutycznych na podstawie pragmatycznego kryterium.

Z Szacunkiem

Dariusz Wyspiański



"Przydatność Terapii Biofeedback w pracy z młodzieżą niedostosowaną społecznie.

Wstęp

Praca w Młodzieżowym Ośrodku Wychowawczym gdzie przebywa młodzież niedostosowana społecznie, jednocześnie upośledzona umysłowo w stopniu lekkim a nie rzadko umiarkowanym, jest pracą trudną. Trudność tej pracy polega przede wszystkim na doborze metod. Wszystkie metody pracy opisane w podręcznikach psychologicznych dostosowane są do osób z tzw. normą intelektualną. Jakakolwiek psychoterapia czy to jest terapia poznawczo-behawioralna, czy psychoanalityczna, humanistyczna, czy Gestalt wymaga od uczestnika samoświadomości, refleksji, przewidywania skutków, wyciągania logicznych wniosków. Osoby upośledzone choćby w lekkim stopniu mają olbrzymie trudności w tych sferach.
Dobór metod pracy musi polegać na poznaniu specyfiki funkcjonowania wychowanka. Dzieci upośledzone umysłowo w stopniu lekkim wykazują zaburzenia w zakresie koncentracji uwagi. Ich uwaga jest krótkotrwała, mało podzielna i łatwo ulega zakłóceniu. Bardzo trudno jest im skoncentrować uwagę, zwłaszcza gdy wymaga odniesienia się do czynności abstrakcyjnych lub zadań sprawiających dziecku duże trudności.
Praca z wychowankiem upośledzonym umysłowo wymaga bardzo dużej cierpliwości, pomysłowości i kreatywności. Jedną z najskuteczniejszych metod pracy z tak specyficznym wychowankiem jest EEG Biofeedback. Jest to metoda bardzo ratrakcyjnar1; z punktu widzenia ucznia, oparta na konkretach, w której widoczna jest relacja "przyczyna-skutek" albo mówiąc bardziej fachowo, behawioralnie "bodziec - reakcja". Wychowankowie bardzo chętnie uczestniczą w prowadzonych w ten sposób zajęciach.
Przewagą Biofeedbacku nad innymi metodami jest możliwość analizowania postępów pacjenta -klienta w terapii. Wyniki każdej sesji są zapisywane w formie ilościowej, co daje pełen obraz pracy pacjenta - klienta.

Trening Biofeedback

Biofeedback jest to samoregulacyjna metoda normalizacji fal EEG pozwalająca na świadomą i dowolną zmianę stanu psychofizjologicznego na zasadzie zmiany wzorca fal mózgowych. Ta metoda relaksu, terapii oraz zwiększania możliwości umysłu, wykorzystuje biologiczne sprzężenie zwrotne różnych sygnałów fizjologicznych, np. elektrycznej aktywności mięśni, elektrycznej aktywności skóry, czy temperatury ciała. Oznacza to, że odpowiednie narzędzia dostarczają informację zwrotną ( feedback ) o tym, co aktualnie dzieje się z organizmem, jakie zmiany fizjologiczne w nim zachodzą. Dzięki temu można nauczyć się świadomie kontrolować i modyfikować funkcje, które normalnie nie są zależne od naszej woli ( m.in. fale mózgowe, napięcie mięśni ).
Biofeedback został wynaleziony w Stanach Zjednoczonych. Metodę stworzyli naukowcy Ośrodka Treningowego dla Astronautów (NASA). Obecnie staje sie coraz bardziej popularnym narzędziem o szerokim zastosowaniu. Jest to jedna z metod psychofizjologii stosowanej i oparta jest o technikę sprzężenia zwrotnego i odczytywanie przebiegu pracy mózgu za pomocą elektrod. Prowadzona jest przy pomocy dwóch systemów komputerowych ze specjalnym modułem EEG Biofeedback. Odpowiednia aparatura umożliwia stałe śledzenie zapisu fal mózgowych pacjenta i zwrotne przesyłanie mu informacji o ich stanie aktualnym, co obrazowane jest w formie videogry. Prowadzący przy pomocy odpowiednich parametrów stymuluje pożądane i hamuje niepożądane pasma fal mózgowych. Zależnie od tego, czy ćwiczący osiągnie ustawione parametry - gra przebiega w sposób pomyślny lub nie. Celem treningu jest poprawa czynności bioelektrycznej mózgu zależnie od zaburzenia. Dzięki tzw. sprzężeniu zwrotnemu trenowana osoba może nauczyć się samodzielnie regulować własne fale mózgowe, wzmacniając je lub osłabiając. Osoba ćwicząca w sposób celowy wpływa na czynność własnego mózgu.
Najważniejszym wydarzeniem w historii Biofeedbacku było doprowadzenie do rozwoju teorii w praktyce klinicznej. Odkrycia Stermana ukierunkowały się na leczenie epilepsji, a dzięki badaniom Kamiya neuroterapia została uznana za skuteczną metodę rozwiązywania skutków urazów, leczenia uzależnień, psychologicznej pracy głębi i jako trening maksymalnej wydajności.

Rodzaje Terapii Biofeedback.

Wyróżnia się kilka rodzajów tej terapii:
- neurofeedback - Biofeedback EEG,
- miofeedback - Biofeedback EMG,
- Biofeedback GSR,
- Biofeedback oddechowy,
- Biofeedback temperaturowy,
- Biofeedback HEG,
- Biofeedback SCP.

Neurofeedback stwarza możliwość rnaprawieniar1; dysfunkcji mózgu, w których występuje nieprawidłowy rytm fal o pewnych częstotliwościach. Niedobór tych fal uniemożliwia wykonywanie pewnych czynności, takich jak np. problem ze skupieniem się nad wykonywanym zadaniem u dzieci z ADHA i ADD. Neurofeedback najczęściej stosowany jest w terapii dzieci z ADHD i ADD, u osób z zaburzeniami procesu uczenia się, z padaczką, po urazach czaszkowych. Również osoby zdrowe korzystają z terapii w celu poprawy pamięci i koncentracji.
Biofeedback GSR (Galvanic Skin Response) lub BSR (Basal Skin Response), czyli reakcja skórno-galwaniczna - odpowiedzialny jest za mierzenie elektrycznego przewodnictwa skóry, która wykazuje tendencję zmienną, w zależności od stanu układu wegetatywnego. Kontrola temperatury i oporności skóry uzależnionych od tego stanu, pozwala na uzyskanie równowagi układu współczulnego i centralnego.
Biofeedback oddechowy służy do wspomagania procesu leczenia padaczki, chorób układu oddechowego i krążeniowego. Zakłada się, iż nieprawidłowy oddech może być spowodowany m. in. bólem, stresem, czy strachem.
Biofeedback temperaturowy który monitoruje temperaturę skóry, którą, poprzez treningi, pacjent uczy się podwyższać, przekraczając temperaturę fizjologiczną. Można osiągnąć taki cel, ponieważ ciepłota skóry nie zależy tylko od czynników zewnętrznych, ale również od stanu psychicznego i fizjologicznego człowieka, wynikającego ze stanu układu współczulnego i przywspółczulnego. Trening stosuje się w celach relaksacyjnych, w leczeniu niedokrwienia kończyn, astmie i chorobie reumatycznej.
Biofeedback HEG (HemoEncephaloGraphy) nie obrazuje fal mózgowych, jak neurofeedback. Mierzy on za pomocą termometru na podczerwień temperaturę głowy lub bada przepływ krwi przez obszary mózgu za pomocą podczerwieni (tzw. podczerwień nIR). Daje to bardzo dobry obraz aktywności mózgu, łącznie z obrazem utlenowania krwi mózgowej. Pacjent sterując obiegiem krwi w danej okolicy kory mózgowej, może uzyskać efekt jej stymulacji. Najlepsze efekty uzyskuje się w leczeniu ADHD i ADD, ponieważ wg badań metodą SPECT u osób nadpobudliwych wykazano zmniejszony przepływ krwi w płacie czołowym. Dzięki Biofeedback HEG są w stanie to zmienić.
Biofeedback SCP (slow cortical potentials) oznacza wolne potencjały korowe, czyli zmiany polaryzacji błony. Jeśli uzyska się negatywną polaryzację, doprowadzi to neurony do większej "gotowość" do pracy.

Cele metody Biofeedback:

Cele ogólne:
- wyciszenie psychiczne i emocjonalne,
- nabycie umiejętności relaksowania się,
- poprawa stanu zdrowia psychicznego,
- nabycie umiejętności panowania nad emocjami,
- synchronizacja półkul mózgowych,
- zwiększenie możliwości umysłu.
Cele szczegółowe:
- poprawa pamięci i sprawniejsze myślenie,
- lepsza koncentracja i zdolność skupiania się,
- podniesienie samooceny,
- większa kreatywność,
- uwolnienie się od lęków i stresu,
- poprawa samopoczucia i nastroju,
- głębsze i spokojniejsze oddychanie,
- lepsze wyniki w nauce,
- podniesienie samooceny,
- panowanie nad zachowaniem i zmniejszenie zachowań agresywnych,
- ograniczenie stanów stresowych i większa zdolność panowania nad stresem.

Jak działa Biofeedback.

Uczeń siada wygodnie i gra w grę komputerową. Czujniki odbierają informacje z jego ciała, rejestrują stan napięcia, rozluźnienia, poziom stresu itp. Dane te są przekazywane do komputera, który analizuje je i dostarcza zwrotnej informacji o tym, co się dzieje w formie czytelnego i zrozumiałego komunikatu ( w formie wizualnej, akustycznej, dobrego wyniku, sukcesu lub porażki). Obserwując te komunikaty (feedback), dowiadujemy się, jaki stan osiąga nasz organizm i uczymy się jak kontrolować stres, rozluźniać się, lepiej oddychać.
w następujących przypadkach:
-dla osób mocno zestresowanych,
-dla osób nadpobudliwych ( w tym dzieci z ADHD ),
-dla osób z zaburzeniami procesu uczenia się,
-dla osób z problemami neurologicznymi,
-dla osób o niskiej samoocenie,
-dla pragnących nauczyć się panowania nad emocjami,
-dla zwiększenia kreatywności i wyrażania siebie,
-w leczeniu chronicznych symptomów choroby, agresji apatii, depresji,
uzależnień i nadwagi.
W związku z powyższym, Biofeedback jest jak najbardziej wskazany jako metoda pracy w młodzieżowym ośrodku wychowawczym. Metoda ta może być z powodzeniem stosowana zarówno u osób chorych, jak i zdrowych, zwiększając optymalizacje funkcji mózgu. Znacząco poprawia koncentracje, polepsza procesy poznawcze, zwiększa samokontrolę, minimalizuje stres itp. Odnotowana także korzystny wpływ tej formy terapii na działania układu immunologicznego i na zwolnienie procesów starzenia się organizmu. Treningi można także z powodzeniem stosować w terapii opóźnień rozwojowych i upośledzeniach umysłowych.
co znajduje odzwierciedlenie w znikomej ilości literatury przedmiotu.
Biofeedback jest bezpiecznym i wszechstronnym treningiem od lat wykorzystywanym za granicą do walki z rożnymi zaburzeniami psychosomatycznymi, skutkami urazów mózgu, chorobami nerwowymi, mięśniowymi oraz psychicznymi. W Polsce powoli zdobywa coraz większą popularność. Wzrastające zainteresowanie tą metodą spowodowane jest wzrastającą liczbą problemów psychosomatycznych związanych z aktualną tendencją do niezdrowego trybu życia. Gdy środki farmakologiczne przestają przynosić efekty, chorzy zaczynają szukać innych sposobów leczenia. Biofeedback jest właśnie takim sposobem. Stanowi on alternatywną formą farmakoterapii, ale nie tylko. Z powodzeniem również może zostać zastosowany jako rzastępcza rękar1; fizjoterapeuty lub pomoc w rehabilitacji.

Skuteczność Terapii Biofeedback.

Biofeedback sprawdza się przede wszystkim jako metoda dająca umiejętność relaksowania się. Wychowankowie ćwiczą dzięki niej lepszą koncentrację i zdolność skupiania się. Wyciszenie psychiczne i emocjonalne wpływa na poprawę pamięci i sprawniejsze myślenie podopiecznych. Zdarzało się, że wychowankowie byli szybko znudzeni z powodu braku większej ilości gier w tej metodzie. Chętnych do korzystania z taj terapii jednak nie brakuje.
Przewagę metodzie Biofeedback daje to, iż jest ona całkowicie bezpieczna, bez żadnych skutków ubocznych. Jednak, aby przyniosła skutek potrzebna jest współpraca wychowanka. Bez jego silnej woli i uporu do osiągnięcia jak najlepszych wyników, uzyskanie efektów jest bliskie zeru.
Minusem tej metody jest to, że większe efekty daje ona po dłuższym i systematycznym stosowaniu. W swojej pracy zawodowej korzystam z Biofeetbacku od niedawna i na wyraźniejsze efekty trzeba poczekać, zwłaszcza, jeśli chodzi o utrwalone panowanie nad zachowaniem i zmniejszenie zachowań agresywnych u wychowanków..."

Literatura:
Smyk K.K., Terapia neurofeedback, Lublin, 2008
Rajang J.,Lessing-Pernak J., Bydgoszcz 2008






May. 14th, 2010

Biofeedback zmienności rytmu serca



 

Szanowni Państwo,

Pozwalam sobie zaprezentować fragment ciekawego artykułu poświęcownego zgadnieniom HRV BIOFEEDBACK.
Tekst pochodzi ze strony : http://www.biofeedback-polska.com/

Z Szacunkiem

Dariusz Wyspiański


"Rytm Serca i Zdrowe Serce

Serce ludzkie jest czterokomorową pompą, która bije z własnym zmiennym rytmem. Ta właśnie cecha pracy serca- zmienność rytmu, warunkuje możliwości adaptacyjne w zdrowym ludzkim organizmie. Z definicji zmiennością rytmu serca nazywamy zmiany w czasie trwania przerwy pomiędzy kolejnymi uderzeniami serca.


W wyniku procesu starzenia, oraz w wyniku choroby tzw. całkowita zmienność rytmu serca ulega redukcji. Zjawisko to doprowadza do wzrostu ryzyka wystąpienia choroby a nawet śmierci organizmu. Dopiero od niedawna naukowcy zajęli się problematyką zmienności rytmu serca i właściwie dopiero od 10 lat mamy możliwość wpływu na własną zmienność rytmu serca.


Znamy wiele klinicznych przykładów potwierdzających, jak ważną wskazówką jest zmienność rytmu serca w ocenie funkcjonowania organizmu: zmiany w rytmie serca poprzedzają patologie zakłócające rozwój płodu; podobnie możemy przewidzieć zespół nagłej śmierci niemowlęcia. Obniżenie zmienności rytmu serca wskazuje na zwiększone ryzyko śmierci u pacjentów po przebytym zawale serca. Stany depresyjne także obniżają zmienność rytmu serca.


Równowaga autonomiczna: Rytm naszego serca jest sterowany poprzez dwa wewnętrzne rozruszniki- węzeł zatokowo-przedsionkowy (SA) i węzeł przedsionkowo-komorowy (AV) - obydwa węzły są odpowiedzialne za rytm serca. Węzeł zatokowo-przedsionkowy inicjuje sygnał elektryczny, który rozpoczyna każdy cykl pracy serca jako pompy. Elektryczny sygnał jest następnie przenoszony poprzez węzeł przedsionkowo-komorowy do komór serca pobudzając je do pracy.


Autonomiczny układ nerwowy warunkuje wiele wewnętrznych procesów zachodzących w naszym organizmie poprzez dwa podukłady. Współczulny układ nerwowy powoduje aktywację lub zwiększenie rytmu serca. Jego przeciwwagę stanowi parasympatyczny układ nerwowy, który zwalnia akcję serca. Główna rola należy tutaj do nerwu błędnego. Równowaga pomiędzy dwoma przeciwstawnymi systemami warunkuje ciągłą oscylację procesu przyspieszania i zwalniania pracy serca.


Znamy ogromną ilość różnych czynników wpływających na zwiększenie rytmu serca. Można zaliczyć tutaj proces oddychania, baroreceptory w tętnicach, proces regulacji ciepłoty ciała, myślenie o rzeczach wywołujących napięcie psychiczne. Aktualny rytm serca jest więc wypadkową wszystkich stymulowanych w ten sposób podrytmów.


Heart Rate Variability Biofeedback (HRV):

Biofeedback Zmienności Rytmu Serca jest nową techniką treningu naszego ciała, którego celem jest zmiana różnorodności rytmu serca, oraz zmiana rytmu serca dominującego u danej osoby. Pierwszy trening HRV biofeedbacku zastosowano w Rosji do leczenia astmy i wielu innych stanów chorobowych. Obecnie, w Stanach Zjednoczonych prowadzimy wiele badań naukowych na temat zastosowania HRV biofeedbacku w tak różnorodnych stanach chorobowych i psychiatrycznych jak:


napady złości
zaburzenia lękowe
astma
choroby układu krążenia
zespół jelita drażliwego
zespół przewlekłego zmęczenia
zespól bólu przewlekłego
fibromialgia

Doniesienia wstępne z prób klinicznych badań naukowych są zachęcające i przynoszą nadzieję, że HRV biofeedback może stanowić metodę leczenia pacjentów z ww. schorzeniami.


Zwiększanie Zmienności Rytmu Serca: Zmiennością rytmu serca nazywamy różnicę pomiędzy najszybszą i najwolniejszą akcją serca. U dwudziestolatków taka różnica wynosi od 5 do 10 uderzeń na minutę w spoczynku. U pięćdziesięciolatków różnica ta wynosi zaledwie 3 do 5. U osób o dużej aktywności fizycznej różnica między maksymalną a minimalną akcją serca w spoczynku jest o wiele większa. HRV biofeedback pozwala osobie zwiększać tą zmienność nawet do 50 uderzeń na minutę w czasie treningu biofeedbacku.


Kierowanie rytmami serca: Analiza spektralna to rodzaj techniki statystycznej, która pozwala na wydzielenie komponent rytmu serca wywołanych wymienianymi wcześniej czynnikami. HRV biofeedback wykorzystuje tą technikę w trenowaniu poszczególnych podrytmów...."




Previous 50

October 2014

S M T W T F S
   1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
262728293031 

Page Summary

Syndicate

RSS Atom
Powered by LiveJournal.com